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Watching cartoons helps children undergoing immunization

Date:
April 28, 2015
Source:
RCNi
Summary:
Watching cartoons can reduce pain and distress in children undergoing immunization before, during and after the procedure, a study has found. Results showed that levels of distress were lowered in children distracted with cartoons. Researchers added that these results concurred with previous studies, especially in showing that children younger than seven years typically report more distress and pain from needles than older children.
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Watching cartoons can reduce pain and distress in children undergoing immunization before, during and after the procedure, a study in Italy has found.

The randomized controlled trial, reported in the journal Nursing Children and Young People, looked at two groups of six-year-old children.

The experimental group consisted of children who underwent immunization while distracted by watching cartoons.

Before the procedure, the child was placed in front of a laptop computer and asked to concentrate on watching the cartoon of their choice, which was either Cinderella or Toy Story.

The control group consisted of children who underwent immunization and a standard technique of verbal distraction by experienced nurses.

The distress of the children was measured on an amended observation scale of behavioral distress and pain was recorded on the Wong-Baker FACES pain rating scale, a visual-numerical scale.

The researchers said results showed that levels of distress were lower in children distracted with cartoons, compared with those distracted using the standard procedure. They added that these results concurred with previous studies, especially in showing that children younger than seven years typically report more distress and pain from needles than older children.

All children undergoing the immunization procedure received two injections, the first subcutaneously and the second intramuscularly.

The level of distress was lower in the group distracted by watching cartoons during both injections. In particular, the levels of distress detected after the subcutaneous injection and during the intramuscular injection were lower to a statistically significant degree, and were marginally significant after intramuscular injection.

'From an organizational point of view, it would be appropriate to provide a structured setting, equipped with all the tools necessary to implement strategies of distraction -- particularly the use of cartoons -- during invasive procedures,' the authors said.

'The use of a simple procedure that is easily and economically executed can enable nurses to ensure that children's first contacts with the health service are positive experiences, and help decrease the number of patients who may develop pre-procedural anxiety or needle phobia, leading them to refuse to undergo medical procedures in adulthood.'


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Journal Reference:

  1. Diana Cerne, Lucia Sannino, Marco Petean. A randomised controlled trial examining the effectiveness of cartoons as a distraction technique. Nursing Children and Young People, 2015; 27 (3): 28 DOI: 10.7748/ncyp.27.3.28.e534

Cite This Page:

RCNi. "Watching cartoons helps children undergoing immunization." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 April 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150428125040.htm>.
RCNi. (2015, April 28). Watching cartoons helps children undergoing immunization. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150428125040.htm
RCNi. "Watching cartoons helps children undergoing immunization." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150428125040.htm (accessed May 28, 2017).

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