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Ultra-long, one-dimensional carbon chains are synthesized for the first time

Date:
April 13, 2016
Source:
University of the Basque Country
Summary:
Researchers have stabilized chains of more than 6,400 carbon atoms using double-walled nanotubes.
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Researchers involved in an international study, in which the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has participated, have stabilised chains of more than 6,400 carbon atoms using double-walled nanotubes.

In a study, in which researchers in the UPV/EHU's Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group led by Ángel Rubio have participated, a new route has been developed to produce carbyne (infinitely long carbon chains whose mechanical properties surpass those of diamond and graphene) by using double-walled carbon nanotubes to protect the carbon chain due to its extreme instability in ambient conditions. The results of the study have been published in the journal Nature Materials.

Elemental carbon appears in many different forms, some of which are very well-known and have been thoroughly studied: diamond, graphite, graphene, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbyne. Within this "carbon family," carbyne (a truly one-dimensional carbon structure) is the only one that has not been synthesised until now, despite having been studied for more than 50 years. Organic chemists across the world had been trying to synthesise increasingly longer carbyne chains by using stabilizing agents; the longest chain obtained so far (achieved in 2010) was 44 carbon atoms.

A research group at the University of Vienna, led by Prof Thomas Pichler, has presented a new, simple means for stabilising carbon chains with a record-breaking length of over 6,400 carbon atoms. They have thus broken the previous record by more than two orders of magnitude. To do this, they used the confined space inside a double-walled carbon nanotube as a nano-reactor to make the ultra-long carbon chains grow and also to provide the chains with great stability. This stability is tremendously important for future applications.

Confirmed

The work carried out in collaboration with various highly prominent research groups worldwide, including the UPV/EHU's Nano-Bio Spectroscopy research Group led by Prof Ángel Rubio, has unambiguously confirmed the existence of these chains by means of structural and optical probes. The researchers have presented their study in the latest edition of Nature Materials. According to the researchers, the direct experimental proof of the confined, ultra-long carbon chains, which are two orders of magnitude longer than the previously proven ones, can be seen as a promising step towards the final objective to obtain perfectly linear carbon chains.

Theoretical studies have shown that after having made these linear chains grow inside the carbon nanotube, the hybrid system could have a metallic nature due to the load transfer from the carbon nanotubes towards the chain, although both the nanotube and the chain are vacuum semi-conductors. So it is possible to control the electronic properties of this hybrid system. Therefore, this new system is not only interesting from the chemical point of view, it could also be very important in the field of nano devices.

According to theoretical models, carbyne has mechanical properties that are unmatched by any known material, as it even outperforms the mechanical resistance and flexibility properties of graphene and diamond. Furthermore, its electronic properties are pointing towards new nano-electronic applications, such as in the development of new magnetic semiconductors, high power density batteries, or in quantum spin transport electronics (spintronics). However, the researchers point out that to do this it would be necessary to extract these ultra-long, linear carbon chains from the double-walled nanotube containing them and stabilise them in some liquid environment.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of the Basque Country. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lei Shi, Philip Rohringer, Kazu Suenaga, Yoshiko Niimi, Jani Kotakoski, Jannik C. Meyer, Herwig Peterlik, Marius Wanko, Seymur Cahangirov, Angel Rubio, Zachary J. Lapin, Lukas Novotny, Paola Ayala, Thomas Pichler. Confined linear carbon chains as a route to bulk carbyne. Nature Materials, 2016; DOI: 10.1038/NMAT4617

Cite This Page:

University of the Basque Country. "Ultra-long, one-dimensional carbon chains are synthesized for the first time." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 April 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160413084519.htm>.
University of the Basque Country. (2016, April 13). Ultra-long, one-dimensional carbon chains are synthesized for the first time. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 25, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160413084519.htm
University of the Basque Country. "Ultra-long, one-dimensional carbon chains are synthesized for the first time." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160413084519.htm (accessed May 25, 2017).

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