Science News
from research organizations

Children who watch lots of TV may have poor bone health later in life

Date:
July 7, 2016
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Consistently watching high levels of television during childhood and adolescence were linked with lower peak bone mass at age 20 years in a recent study. Hours of television watching per week were recorded by parental or self-report at 5, 8, 10, 14, 17 and 20 years of age in 1181 participants. Those who consistently watched ?14 hours/week of television had lower bone mineral content than those who watched less television, even after adjusting for height, body mass, physical activity, calcium intake, vitamin D levels, alcohol, and smoking (all at age 20).
Share:
FULL STORY

Consistently watching high levels of television during childhood and adolescence were linked with lower peak bone mass at age 20 years in a recent study.

In the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study, hours of television watching per week were recorded by parental or self-report at 5, 8, 10, 14, 17 and 20 years of age in 1181 participants.

Those who consistently watched ≥14 hours/week of television had lower bone mineral content than those who watched less television, even after adjusting for height, body mass, physical activity, calcium intake, vitamin D levels, alcohol, and smoking (all at age 20).

"Since attainment of optimal peak bone mass is protective against osteoporosis later in life, reducing sedentary time in children may have long-term skeletal benefits," the authors wrote.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Wiley. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joanne A McVeigh, Kun Zhu, Jenny Mountain, Craig E Pennell, Stephen J Lye, John P Walsh, Leon M Straker. Longitudinal Trajectories of Television Watching Across Childhood and Adolescence Predict Bone Mass at Age 20 Years in the Raine Study. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 2016; DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.2890

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Children who watch lots of TV may have poor bone health later in life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 July 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160707083442.htm>.
Wiley. (2016, July 7). Children who watch lots of TV may have poor bone health later in life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 8, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160707083442.htm
Wiley. "Children who watch lots of TV may have poor bone health later in life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160707083442.htm (accessed May 8, 2017).