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Insight on ovarian cancer

Date:
October 20, 2016
Source:
Yale Cancer Center
Summary:
In a recent study, researchers have demonstrated that the tumors release substances called cytokines to attract macrophages.
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Macrophages activate ovarian tumor cell proliferation and migration during metastasis.
Credit: Journal of Clinical Investigation

Ovarian cancer is difficult to diagnose at early stages.

Once it has spread beyond the ovaries, it is more challenging to treat and can be fatal.

During metastasis, ovarian tumor cells detach from the primary tumor site and migrate to the abdominal cavity, where their survival is supported by white blood cells known as tumor-associated macrophages.

In a recent study, senior author and Yale pathology professor Wang Min demonstrated that the tumors release substances called cytokines to attract macrophages, which then secrete growth factors that promote tumor cell growth and proliferation. The study reveals a mechanism that provides researchers with a promising target for treating ovarian and other metastatic cancers.

The study is published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Yale Cancer Center. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mingzhu Yin, Xia Li, Shu Tan, Huanjiao Jenny Zhou, Weidong Ji, Stefania Bellone, Xiaocao Xu, Haifeng Zhang, Alessandro D. Santin, Ge Lou, Wang Min. Tumor-associated macrophages drive spheroid formation during early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2016; DOI: 10.1172/JCI87252

Cite This Page:

Yale Cancer Center. "Insight on ovarian cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 October 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161020163709.htm>.
Yale Cancer Center. (2016, October 20). Insight on ovarian cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 24, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161020163709.htm
Yale Cancer Center. "Insight on ovarian cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161020163709.htm (accessed May 24, 2017).

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