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Fish lightly to keep snapper on the reef

Fishing is fundamentally altering the food chain in coral reefs and putting extra pressure on top-level predator fish

Date:
January 12, 2017
Source:
Lancaster University
Summary:
Scientists have looked at 253 coral reef sites across the Indian Ocean. They found that top-level predator fish -- such as snapper and grouper -- were easily overfished and require a different approach if they are to be conserved.
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Journal Reference:

  1. Graham, Nicholas A. J. et al. Human disruption of coral reef trophic structure. Current Biology, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.062

Cite This Page:

Lancaster University. "Fish lightly to keep snapper on the reef: Fishing is fundamentally altering the food chain in coral reefs and putting extra pressure on top-level predator fish." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 January 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170112141408.htm>.
Lancaster University. (2017, January 12). Fish lightly to keep snapper on the reef: Fishing is fundamentally altering the food chain in coral reefs and putting extra pressure on top-level predator fish. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170112141408.htm
Lancaster University. "Fish lightly to keep snapper on the reef: Fishing is fundamentally altering the food chain in coral reefs and putting extra pressure on top-level predator fish." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170112141408.htm (accessed May 28, 2017).

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