Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Awareness, Quick Action Key To Battling Canine Bacterial Disease

Date:
January 12, 2000
Source:
Kansas State University
Summary:
Saving the life of a dog with Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome requires quick action by the pet owner and awareness of the disease by the attending veterinarian. The course of the disease from initial recognition of disease to death can be as short as six hours.

MANHATTAN -- Saving the life of a dog with Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome requires quick action by the pet owner and awareness of the disease by the attending veterinarian.

That's the word from Dr. Brad Fenwick, Kansas State University veterinarian who has been studying the disease since he first observed it among racing greyhounds. Little is known about transmission or prevention.

"Typically, dogs that develop Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome are healthy prior to being found very sick only a few hours later," Fenwick said. "The course of the disease from initial recognition of disease to death can be as short as six hours. Typically, infected dogs are found lying down, on their side, either too weak to move or experiencing rigidity with mild convulsions. At an early stage vomiting may occur. The dog also may have rapid, uncontrolled fine muscle twitches."

Fenwick said a consistent and important clinical finding is a very high temperature -- greater than 105 degrees F. Treatment at this point with injectable antibiotics, clindamycin or crystalline penicillin-G, is important in order to increase the likelihood of recovery.

As the disease progresses a deep, nonproductive cough typical of pulmonary edema develops. The dog may soon experience spontaneous hemorrhaging including coughing up blood, bleeding from the nose, severe bruising of the skin, and in some cases bloody diarrhea. At this point, antibiotics and even aggressive shock therapy are generally not sufficient to save these dogs. Fenwick said the mortality rate is 70-80 percent for dogs that are not treated quickly and appropriately.

When owners and their veterinarians catch the disease in its early stages, the chances for a recovery are significantly improved, he said.

Although he said the cause may be new strains of Streptococci, Fenwick does not believe Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome is a brand new disease, but rather that it has been misdiagnosed in the past. Cases have been confirmed from as early as 1979.

"It looks very similar to a poisoning -- similar to what can happen when a dog gets into rat poison. It's more of a toxicosis than many other bacterial infections," he said. And although he believes it is more common than once thought -- that cases have been occurring unrecognized for many years, he said it is still relatively uncommon.

"We think it is fairly rare," Fenwick said, "maybe one case in every 50,000 dogs, but that is just a guess, because we do not keep death certificates on dogs, nor do we have reportable statistics on dog deaths. Many veterinarians have never seen a case. Others learn more about it and then recall cases they have had in the past and wonder if a specific case might have been Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome."

Fenwick said some misinformation is being circulated about the syndrome. He said there is no evidence that the disease can be transmitted from dog to dog, from humans to dogs, or from dogs to humans. The human version of the disease first emerged about 10 years ago. Among the victims was Muppet creator Jim Henson. Rapid onset, high fever, hypotension and shock are prominent characteristics of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome in humans and dogs.

Fenwick does not recommend that dog owners make any changes in their routine to try to prevent the disease.

"There is no justification to do anything differently," he said. "We have no evidence that dog show conditions, crowding, sharing crates or bowls, or stress is a cause of this disease. People should not panic and change what they are doing. There is no reason to stop showing or participating in performance sports."

Also, although Fenwick is conducting research on the disease, dog owners should not expect to see a vaccine for it. The disease is caused by a toxin -- Toxic Shock Toxin -- that is a super-antigen, which short-circuits the immune system. If a vaccine with a super-antigen is injected into an individual, it wouldn't be effective. Fenwick explained that it is the same reason people can get food poisoning over and over again -- the body can't produce an effective immunity against these toxins.

A tissue sample is required to confirm the diagnosis of Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome.If you or your veterinarian have questions, or if you think your dog may have the disease, contact Dr. Brad Fenwick, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, at (785) 532-4412, or e-mail: fenwick@vet.ksu.edu. Fenwick would like information on any dog who may have or have had Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome, surviving or not. Contact him regarding cultures and tissue samples he needs and where to send them.

Prepared by Cheryl May. For more information contact Fenwick at (785) 532-4412.

****

"Canine Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome" - Fact sheet

Brad Fenwick D.V.M., M.S., Ph.D., DACVM
Department of Diagnostic Medicine / Pathobiology
College of Veterinary Medicine
Kansas State University
785-532-4412 (Phone)
785-532-4039 (FAX)
fenwick@vet.ksu.edu

Streptococci are a family of gram-positive bacteria which cause either localized or systemic infections in humans and animals. While some strains rarely cause disease and are often considered to be commensal inhabitants of the skin and mucosal surfaces (oral, nasal, intestinal), other strains are capable of causing life-threatening primary infections. In dogs, Streptococci are known for their ability to occasionally cause septicemia in puppies and a range of localized diseases in adults.

Approximately 10 years ago, new strains of Streptococci (Group A, beta-hemolytic) emerged as the cause of a previously unrecognized disease in humans. The clinical disease became known as Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (STSS) because it closely mimics the better known "Toxic Shock" in women caused by toxin producing strains of Staphylococci. Rapid onset, high fever, hypotension and shock are prominent characteristics of STSS in humans. At approximately the same time, a number of unusual cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) caused by Streptococci were also reported in humans. This syndrome relates to a very aggressive and rapidly advancing infection of subcutaneous tissues with extensive tissue destruction and high mortality rates.

In 1996, Miller and Prescott reported on a series of seven dogs from southern Ontario that had severe systemic disease and shock associated with infection with b-hemolytic Streptococci canis (Group G). In four of these dogs the infection was associated with necrotizing fasciitis. As a result of surgical debridement, supportive medical care, and treatment with antibiotics, all of these dogs survived. In contrast, all three dogs with streptococcal shock without necrotizing fasciitis died or were euthanized within 48 hours. The lungs were considered the primary site of infections in two of these dogs as their clinical signs were related to respiratory distress and shock. Historically, similar disease outbreaks have been reported by Garnett et al (1982) in a group of research dogs, in captive coyotes by Gates and Green in 1979, and in racing Greyhounds in 1981 by Sundberg et al. More recently, multiple outbreaks of fatal STSS occurred in racing Greyhounds in 1992 and again in January/February of 1999. Additional cases have recently been reported in other dog breeds and has become a concern for owners of dogs housed in large groups or participating in shows or performance events. Like in humans, the reason for the emergence/re-emergence of canine STSS/NF is unclear and very little is known about transmission or prevention.

Typically, dogs that develop STSS are healthy prior to being found very sick only a few hours later. The course of the disease of initial recognition of disease to death can be as short as 6 hours. Typically, infected dogs are found in lateral recumbence, either being too weak to move or experiencing rigidity with mild convulsions. At an early stage vomiting may occur. Rapid, uncontrolled fine muscle fasciculations are often noted. A consistent and important clinical finding is a very high temperature (greater than 105 degrees F). Treatment at this point with injectable antibiotics (clindamycin or crystalline penicillin-G) is important in order to increase the likelihood of recovery. As the disease progresses a deep, nonproductive cough typical of pulmonary edema develops. Rapidly, spontaneous hemorrhaging typical of disseminated intravascular coagulation develops which is associated with coughing up blood, bleeding from the nose, severe bruising of the skin, and in some cases bloody diarrhea. Profound hypotension and toxic cardiomyopathy may develop. At this point, antibiotics and even with aggressive shock therapy are generally not sufficient to save these dogs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kansas State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Kansas State University. "Awareness, Quick Action Key To Battling Canine Bacterial Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 January 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000111093303.htm>.
Kansas State University. (2000, January 12). Awareness, Quick Action Key To Battling Canine Bacterial Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000111093303.htm
Kansas State University. "Awareness, Quick Action Key To Battling Canine Bacterial Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000111093303.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) — Where's a body buried? Buster's nose can often tell you. He's a cadaver dog, specially trained to find human remains and increasingly being used by law enforcement and accepted in courts. These dogs are helping solve even decades-old mysteries. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
White Lion Cubs Born in Belgrade Zoo

White Lion Cubs Born in Belgrade Zoo

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) — Two white lion cubs, an extremely rare subspecies of the African lion, were recently born at Belgrade Zoo. They are being bottle fed by zoo keepers after they were rejected by their mother after birth. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) — He is leading a one man agricultural revolution in Mali - Oumar Diatabe uses traditional farming methods to get the most out of his land and is teaching others across the country how to do the same. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Goliath Spider Will Give You Nightmares

Goliath Spider Will Give You Nightmares

Buzz60 (Oct. 20, 2014) — An entomologist stumbled upon a South American Goliath Birdeater. With a name like that, you know it's a terrifying creepy crawler. Sean Dowling (@SeanDowlingTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins