Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

LSU Researchers Find Cause Of Respiratory Diseases In Cattle

Date:
May 16, 2001
Source:
Louisiana State University
Summary:
Researchers at Louisiana State University have discovered that a bovine virus not previously believed to cause respiratory-tract infections in cattle is associated with several outbreaks of shipping-fever pneumonia, the most fatal form of bovine respiratory-tract disease. The virus has been detected among cattle in 11 different states in the southern and western United States.

BATON ROUGE -- Researchers at Louisiana State University have discovered that a bovine virus not previously believed to cause respiratory-tract infections in cattle is associated with several outbreaks of shipping-fever pneumonia, the most fatal form of bovine respiratory-tract disease. The virus has been detected among cattle in 11 different states in the southern and western United States.

Related Articles


The respiratory bovine coronavirus had not been considered a factor in shipping-fever pneumonia prior to this discovery, said Dr. Johannes Storz of the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine. The research findings could also lead to a vaccine for the coronavirus, Storz said.

"Shipping fever results from the stress of transporting cattle, which favors viral and bacterial infections of the respiratory tracts," said Storz, professor of veterinary microbiology and former head of the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology at the Vet School. Approximately 90 percent of cattle involved in two major U.S. outbreaks of shipping-fever pneumonia were infected with the coronavirus, Storz said.

Storz and his research team at LSU employed a novel technology for cultivating viruses from respiratory-tract samples from cattle. This new method involved the use of specific clones of cultured animal cells. Once the samples from the cattle were applied to the cloned cell cultures, Storz observed the coronavirus.

The respiratory coronavirus infects cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tracts, including the lungs. Storz said the coronavirus kills the cells and causes inflammation in the mucous-membrane passages of the respiratory tract. "Ultimately, these infections interfere with the cells' normal function in the respiratory tract," Storz said.

Infectious diseases are a continuous threat to humans and animals alike. This fact is evident by the recent outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in Europe. Storz and his research team at LSU are fighting against outbreaks by exploring the possible causes of these diseases.

"We need to be constantly aware of potential emerging infectious diseases and the possible spread of known infectious diseases," Storz said.

Infectious diseases also have a huge economic impact on the beef and dairy industries. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the cattle industry suffered a $450 million loss in 1996 due to respiratory-tract diseases alone.

Storz's research has led to several advancements in the study of respiratory-tract diseases. He and his team have developed new techniques and specific diagnostic tests that detect viral infections in cattle. His research has also defined the components of the respiratory coronavirus, a process that is necessary to produce an effective vaccine.

This research advance was accomplished in cooperation with scientists from the LSU Agricultural Center, the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University and the Agricultural Research Service division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The research was made possible through funds from the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, the Louisiana Education Quality Support Fund, industrial companies such as Immtech Biologicals and the Bayer Corporation, the Louisiana Beef Industry Council and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Storz and his research team have been invited to present their findings at both national and international conventions. The most recent is an invitation to present a lecture at the 2002 World Congress on Diseases of Cattle in Hannover, Germany. "We are delighted about the opportunity to share our discoveries with veterinarians and scientists of international organizations," Storz said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Louisiana State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Louisiana State University. "LSU Researchers Find Cause Of Respiratory Diseases In Cattle." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 May 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010516080828.htm>.
Louisiana State University. (2001, May 16). LSU Researchers Find Cause Of Respiratory Diseases In Cattle. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010516080828.htm
Louisiana State University. "LSU Researchers Find Cause Of Respiratory Diseases In Cattle." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010516080828.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 27, 2014) A British palaeontologist has discovered a new species of dinosaur while studying fossils in a Canadian museum. Pentaceratops aquilonius was related to Triceratops and lived at the end of the Cretaceous Period, around 75 million years ago. Jim Drury has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) Tryptophan, a chemical found naturally in turkey meat, gets blamed for sleepiness after Thanksgiving meals. But science points to other culprits. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) The iconic piano from "Casablanca" and the Cowardly Lion suit from "The Wizard of Oz" fetch millions at auction. Sara Hemrajani reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins