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Oceanic Bacterial Photopigments Convert Light Into Biochemical Energy

Date:
June 14, 2001
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
A new energy-generating, light-absorbing pigment called proteorhodopsin is widespread in the world’s oceans, say scientists funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and affiliated with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).

A new energy-generating, light-absorbing pigment called proteorhodopsin is widespread in the world’s oceans, say scientists funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and affiliated with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). Their discovery is reported in this week’s issue of the journal Nature. Last fall in the journal Science, the MBARI researchers described the first marine bacterium with this photopigment that can generate cellular energy using light.

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“Advances in technology are letting us view the marine microbial world in new ways," said Ed DeLong, leader of the MBARI research group. Colleague Oded Béjà added, "We were lucky to find these different proteorhodopsins out there in the vast ocean.”

In the recent study, samples of oceanic bacteria collected from Monterey Bay, Antarctica, and Hawaii were analyzed for the presence of active photopigment. In collaboration with John and Elena Spudich from the University of Texas Medical School, the scientists used laser flash spectroscopic techniques on naturally occurring marine microbes to search for the new photochemical activity in oceanic waters.

The scientists observed chemical activity stimulated by light flashes in native marine microbes, similar to the activity seen in earlier laboratory studies of proteorhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin. These observations showed that the microbes and active photopigment were present in abundance at the ocean’s surface.

The researchers also showed that genetic variants of the photoactive microbes contain different proteorhodopsins in different ocean habitats. The protein pigments appear to be tuned to absorb light of different wavelengths that match the quality of light available in different environments. Specific adaptations in the photopigment structure have optimized different variants functioning best at different depths in the water column.

NSF is an independent federal agency which supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering, with an annual budget of about $4.5 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states, through grants to about 1,800 universities and institutions nationwide. Each year, NSF receives about 30,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 10,000 new funding awards.


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The above story is based on materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Oceanic Bacterial Photopigments Convert Light Into Biochemical Energy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010614063941.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (2001, June 14). Oceanic Bacterial Photopigments Convert Light Into Biochemical Energy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010614063941.htm
National Science Foundation. "Oceanic Bacterial Photopigments Convert Light Into Biochemical Energy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010614063941.htm (accessed January 30, 2015).

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