Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers Make Key Genome Public On The Internet

Date:
August 22, 2001
Source:
University Of Washington
Summary:
Researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine, DuPont and the University of Campinas in Brazil, with partial funding from the National Science Foundation, have sequenced the genome of an important organism, Agrobacterium, and made it freely available on the Internet. This information is available at http://www.agrobacterium.org.

Researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine, DuPont and the University of Campinas in Brazil, with partial funding from the National Science Foundation, have sequenced the genome of an important organism, Agrobacterium, and made it freely available on the Internet. This information is available at http://www.agrobacterium.org.

Related Articles


Agrobacterium has the unique property of inserting small pieces of genetic material into a plant, animal or fungal cell that it colonizes. The bacterium has had great utility in molecular studies of botany, and has enabled scientists to study the effects of plant genes on various properties of plants such as growth rate, maturation, flower color and yield.

The organism also serves as a useful tool to study a number of infectious human diseases in which the inciting organism injects material into a cell.

On a practical side, Agrobacterium is a basic tool for genetic engineering of foodstuffs to produce crops that are more nutritious, less allergenic and disease-, insect-, salt- and cold-resistant, and a whole host of other promising traits.

The sequencing of the bacterial genome will provide insights into the unique properties of this organism, which enable it to undertake the genetic engineering of its host cells. This work is the culmination of almost two decades of work at the University of Washington by a group of microbiologists including Dr. Eugene Nester, Dr. Milton Gordon and Dr. Mary-Dell Chilton. The scale of the project was so large that the team included Dr. Maynard Olson, professor of medicine and genetics, and his researchers at the University of Washington Genome Center; researchers from DuPont and its subsidiary, Pioneer, who have a large sequencing facility; and the Brazil group, who had previously determined the sequence of another organism important to agriculture.

The genome of Agrobacterium is complex, containing a total of more than 5.67 million base pairs. The UW researchers say that from a broader perspective, this work is part of an ongoing second green revolution in agriculture. They say this revolution holds the promise of meeting the needs of an increasing world population – at a time when water, agricultural land, and forests are becoming increasingly scarce.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Washington. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Washington. "Researchers Make Key Genome Public On The Internet." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010822081137.htm>.
University Of Washington. (2001, August 22). Researchers Make Key Genome Public On The Internet. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010822081137.htm
University Of Washington. "Researchers Make Key Genome Public On The Internet." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/08/010822081137.htm (accessed March 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bionic Ants Could Be Tomorrow's Factory Workers

Bionic Ants Could Be Tomorrow's Factory Workers

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 30, 2015) Industrious 3D printed bionic ants working together could toil in the factories of the future, says German technology company Festo. The robotic insects cooperate and coordinate their actions and movements to achieve a common aim. Amy Pollock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Captive-Born Panda Triplets Are Eight Months Old

Captive-Born Panda Triplets Are Eight Months Old

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Mar. 30, 2015) The world&apos;s only surviving captivity-born panda triplets turn eight months old, according to China’s state media. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lions Make Surprise Comeback in Gabon

Lions Make Surprise Comeback in Gabon

AFP (Mar. 30, 2015) Lions have made a comeback in southeast Gabon, after disappearing for years, according to live footage from US wildlife organisation Panthera. Duration: 00:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ancient Egyptian Beer Making Vessels Discovered in Israel

Ancient Egyptian Beer Making Vessels Discovered in Israel

AFP (Mar. 30, 2015) Fragments of pottery used by Egyptians to make beer and dating back 5,000 years have been discovered on a building site in Tel Aviv, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said on Sunday. Duration: 00:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins