Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

University Of Missouri Researchers Discover Decontamination Treatment For Anthrax

Date:
November 22, 2001
Source:
University Of Missouri-Columbia
Summary:
In response to the immediate threats of bio-terrorist attacks, University of Missouri-Columbia College of Engineering researchers Randy Curry and Kenneth McDonald have developed a process that rapidly kills a wide range of microbes on any surface, including anthrax spores and viruses.

COLUMBIA, Mo. -- In response to the immediate threats of bio-terrorist attacks, University of Missouri-Columbia College of Engineering researchers Randy Curry and Kenneth McDonald have developed a process that rapidly kills a wide range of microbes on any surface, including anthrax spores and viruses.

Related Articles


The MU decontamination solution, which is suitable for virtually any surface material, is applied by foam, spray, mist, fog, or steam and kills most microbes within a few minutes of exposure. Moreover, the properties can be enhanced by ultraviolet light interaction, reducing the decontamination time to a few seconds. The MU researchers' process works on dense spore clusters such as anthrax, and is not harmful to the environment.

Tests with anthrax spores have shown a complete destruction of the spores. The environmentally benign compound is inexpensive and can be sprayed using either foaming agents or soaps, or can be applied using ingredients that permit the fluid to uniformly coat all surfaces. When sprayed, the compound dries and does not require cleanup.

The compound can be made with commercial off-the-shelf chemicals, is inexpensive and easily available. The decontaminant is compatible with paper, carpet, linoleum, metal and other typical office or residential surfaces. Although developed for military defense applications the decontaminant is applicable to any civilian application including decontamination of buildings, post offices, ventilation ducts, carpet, clothes and electronic equipment. The decontaminant is compatible with firefighting foams.

The U.S. Marine Corp. and the United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command funded this research project.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Missouri-Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Missouri-Columbia. "University Of Missouri Researchers Discover Decontamination Treatment For Anthrax." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 November 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011120053221.htm>.
University Of Missouri-Columbia. (2001, November 22). University Of Missouri Researchers Discover Decontamination Treatment For Anthrax. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011120053221.htm
University Of Missouri-Columbia. "University Of Missouri Researchers Discover Decontamination Treatment For Anthrax." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011120053221.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 27, 2014) A British palaeontologist has discovered a new species of dinosaur while studying fossils in a Canadian museum. Pentaceratops aquilonius was related to Triceratops and lived at the end of the Cretaceous Period, around 75 million years ago. Jim Drury has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) Tryptophan, a chemical found naturally in turkey meat, gets blamed for sleepiness after Thanksgiving meals. But science points to other culprits. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) The iconic piano from "Casablanca" and the Cowardly Lion suit from "The Wizard of Oz" fetch millions at auction. Sara Hemrajani reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins