Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sea Grant Research Indicates Bacterial Toxin May Control Zebra Mussel

Date:
June 13, 2002
Source:
National Sea Grant College Program
Summary:
In a recently completed New York Sea Grant-funded investigation, evidence has shown that a common soil bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens, produces a toxin that kills the non-native mussels.

In a recently completed New York Sea Grant-funded investigation, evidence has shown that a common soil bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens, produces a toxin that kills the non-native mussels.

Zebra mussels first were identified in June 1988 in Lake St. Clair, having most likely arrived in the ballast water of ships from Europe. The Sea Grant National Aquatic Nuisance Species Clearinghouse estimates approximately $1 billion in damages in North America related to the spread of the non-indigenous aquatic mussel, which can cause major problems at water dependent infrastructure including electric power generation stations, water treatment plants, in irrigation systems, and other industrial and recreational facilities.

Since 1991, researcher Daniel Molloy has led a Sea Grant-supported effort to identify predators, parasites, and infectious microbes that can kill zebra mussels. In small trials, Molloy says the bacterium has eliminated the mussels in pipes at a hydropower facility with a 95 percent kill. The bacterium destroys a digestive gland within the mussel, leading to their death. Because even dead Pseudomonas cells kill zebra mussels, Molloy suspects that the bacterium contains a toxin within its cell walls.

He and his colleagues have conducted preliminary tests indicating that the microbe does not harm untargeted species, including fish and native mussels. They are now working to identify and purify the toxin. And then? Molloy says the big challenge will be to find a way to produce enough of the bacterium or its toxin commercially. "This research is the next logical step in the path toward commercialization of the bacterium as an innovative, ecologically-safe, and effective zebra mussel control agent."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Sea Grant College Program. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Sea Grant College Program. "Sea Grant Research Indicates Bacterial Toxin May Control Zebra Mussel." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 June 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020611070917.htm>.
National Sea Grant College Program. (2002, June 13). Sea Grant Research Indicates Bacterial Toxin May Control Zebra Mussel. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020611070917.htm
National Sea Grant College Program. "Sea Grant Research Indicates Bacterial Toxin May Control Zebra Mussel." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020611070917.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Visitors Feel Part of the Pack at Wolf Preserve

Visitors Feel Part of the Pack at Wolf Preserve

AP (July 31, 2014) Seacrest Wolf Preserve on the northern Florida panhandle allows more than 10,000 visitors each year to get up close and personal with Arctic and British Columbian Wolves. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

AP (July 30, 2014) Thousands of people are trekking to a Bavarian farmer's field to check out a mysterious set of crop circles. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins