Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dartmouth Medical School Geneticists Discover New Role For Antisense RNA

Date:
February 28, 2003
Source:
Dartmouth Medical School
Summary:
Dartmouth Medical School geneticists studying the biological clock have opened yet another window into the role of an unusual form of RNA known as antisense that blocks the messages of protein-encoding genes.

Hanover, NH – Dartmouth Medical School geneticists studying the biological clock have opened yet another window into the role of an unusual form of RNA known as antisense that blocks the messages of protein-encoding genes.

Related Articles


They found that antisense RNA appears to regulate core timing genes in the circadaian clock that drives the 24-hour light-dark cycle of Neurospora, a model organism better known as bread mold.

The results are reported in the February 27 Nature by Drs. Jennifer Loros and Jay C. Dunlap, both DMS professors, and Susan K. Crosthwaite, formerly a postdoctoral fellow at DMS, and Cas Kramer, both of the University of Manchester, England.

Messenger RNA, which has a single-stranded sequence of nucleotides, is called "sense" because it can be decoded to produce a gene product (a protein). Like DNA, this mRNA can form duplexes with a second strand of RNA whose base sequence is complementary to the first strand. The second strand is called the antisense strand because its nucleotide sequence is the complement of "sense" message. When mRNA forms a duplex with a complementary antisense RNA sequence, the message translation is turned off so the sense strand can no longer be decoded to yield a protein product.

As scientists identify more antisense RNAs, they are beginning to realize these might affect a wide variety of processes. The recent findings, write the authors, "provide an unexpected link between antisense RNA and circadian timing."

Studying the development of spores in the bread mold Neurospora, Dunlap and Loros have teased apart the molecular gears that form the basis of most living clocks. Light and dark cycles reset the clocks, they found, the way turning the hands of a clock does. The clock mechanism, a biological oscillator, keeps time through the delicately balanced interplay of the Neurospora clock genes and proteins in a complex of feedback loops.

"We found a long RNA antisense transcript that arises from the frequency gene, known to encode factors important for the operation of the circadian clock in Neurospora," says Dunlap. "The sense transcript encodes proteins that are involved in the feedback loop that is the oscillator in the clock. The antisense transcript runs in the opposite direction, and apparently does not encode a protein, so its actual role is unknown at present. It may simply bock translation, or it may destabilize the sense message. Antisense transcripts are already known, but usually they are quite small, on the order of 20 to 25 bases. This one is quite large, nearly 5,000 bases."

In normal bread mold strains living in the dark, levels of antisense frequency transcripts cycle with respect to the amount of sense frequency transcripts, and they are inducible by light, the researchers determined. However, in strains mutated to abolish induction of antisense frequency RNA by light, the internal clock time was delayed, and resetting of the clock by light was altered.

If similar environmental factors regulate both sense and antisense transcripts, the authors suggest, a role for antisense frequency RNA might be to confer the ability to keep accurate time by limiting the clock response to extremes in the environment. Likewise other antisense RNAs might be involved in maintaining internal stability in other organisms.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Dartmouth Medical School. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Dartmouth Medical School. "Dartmouth Medical School Geneticists Discover New Role For Antisense RNA." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030228072503.htm>.
Dartmouth Medical School. (2003, February 28). Dartmouth Medical School Geneticists Discover New Role For Antisense RNA. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030228072503.htm
Dartmouth Medical School. "Dartmouth Medical School Geneticists Discover New Role For Antisense RNA." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030228072503.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins