Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Yeast Genomes Reveal New Sites Of Gene Control

Date:
May 30, 2003
Source:
Washington University School Of Medicine
Summary:
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have begun unraveling the network of genes and proteins that regulate the lives of cells. The investigators compared the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) to those of five other yeast species to identify all the locations at which molecules known as regulatory proteins attach to DNA to turn genes on and off.

St. Louis, May 30, 2003 — Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have begun unraveling the network of genes and proteins that regulate the lives of cells. The investigators compared the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) to those of five other yeast species to identify all the locations at which molecules known as regulatory proteins attach to DNA to turn genes on and off. The study is published in the May 30 issue of the journal Science. Among the many potential sites of gene regulation, 79 were predicted to be definitive new regulatory sites. The investigators also discovered 43 new genes and determined that 515 suspected genes are not genes at all. The findings revised the estimated number of genes in the S. cerevisiae genome from 6,331 to 5,773.

Related Articles


"This is the first step in understanding the gene-regulation network in a simple cell," says principal investigator Mark Johnston, Ph.D., professor of genetics and interim chair of genetics. "This work also will provide guidelines for analyzing the regulatory network of human cells, which will be a much more complex task."

Regulatory sequences are important, Johnston notes, because they are the basis of development. For example, a liver cell differs from a brain cell not because they have different genes—both cells have the same set of genes—but because of the genes they use. And that’s determined by the regulatory sequences that activate one set of genes in the liver and another set in the brain. A variety of diseases, including cancer, are caused by problems in gene regulation.

Identifying gene regulatory sites is not easy, however. These regions serve as docking sites for DNA binding proteins that turn the gene on or off. They lack the typical DNA patterns that help scientists recognize the body of the gene, which contains information about the structure of a protein.

Johnston and his colleagues compared the genomes of S. cerevisiae to five other yeast species, hypothesizing that the regions that were most alike in all six would be potential regulatory sites.

The investigators found about 8,000 of these conserved sites, about one-third of which already were known regulatory sequences. After eliminating the known sites from the total, the investigators searched for other evidence that these sites are functional, and pinpointed 79 sites located within or near genes which are excellent candidates for new regulatory sequences.

The team will is now refining the number of sites by determining which yeast regulatory proteins bind to the them.

"Now," Johnston says, "we can begin tackling the really interesting question: how a relatively small number of regulatory proteins coordinate the activity of more than 5,700 genes to maintain a healthy, growing yeast cell."

###

Cliften P, Sudarsanam P, Desikan A, Fulton L, Fulton B, Majors J, Waterston R, Cohen BA, Johnston M. Finding functional features in Saccharomyces genomes by phylogenetic footprinting. Science, May 30, 2003.

Funding from the National Institute of General Sciences supported this research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University School Of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Washington University School Of Medicine. "Yeast Genomes Reveal New Sites Of Gene Control." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 May 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030530082133.htm>.
Washington University School Of Medicine. (2003, May 30). Yeast Genomes Reveal New Sites Of Gene Control. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030530082133.htm
Washington University School Of Medicine. "Yeast Genomes Reveal New Sites Of Gene Control." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030530082133.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins