Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Wound Healers Cause Skin Disease

Date:
October 15, 2004
Source:
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research
Summary:
Dutch researcher Manon Franssen has shown that cells which heal the skin following an injury play an important role in the development of the skin disease psoriasis. In people with psoriasis, the skin peels much faster than normal so that it flakes and becomes inflamed.

Dutch researcher Manon Franssen has shown that cells which heal the skin following an injury play an important role in the development of the skin disease psoriasis. In people with psoriasis, the skin peels much faster than normal so that it flakes and becomes inflamed.

Franssen investigated the transit amplifying cells in the uppermost layer of the skin. These cells develop from stem cells (general unspecialised cells) and specialise into skin cells when new skin cells are needed. The transit amplifying cells are involved in the healing of the skin following an injury and in the regular renewing of the skin.

Normally these cells wait until they receive a signal to develop into skin cells. Franssen discovered that in people with psoriasis, some of the transit amplifying cells divide without waiting for a signal. As a result of this, too many skin cells develop and the skin is renewed more quickly than normal. However, when Franssen cultured the transit amplifying cells from the skin of psoriasis patients, these cells grew less quickly. Exactly how the cell division of transit amplifying cells and stem cells is regulated, is not yet clear.

In the case of psoriasis, not only is there a more rapid renewal of the skin, but the number of cell layers on the surface also increases. The skin condition causes red marks that are rich in blood and often inflamed. These red marks are covered with shiny white flakes of skin and sometimes itch. Psoriasis is not infectious.

A cure for the disease is still not available and at present only the symptoms can be controlled. According to the Dutch Psoriasis Society about 300,000 people in the Netherlands suffer from a form of this disease. Stem cell therapy might be able to provide a cure for them in the future.

Stem cells currently form an important research area in medicine. Stem cell therapy – the replacement of defective or absent stem cells, tissues or organs in patients – should be able to cure many diseases in the future.

Stem cells from the uppermost layer of the skin have never been isolated. The isolation of their descendants, the transit amplifying cells, is an important step in the right direction. By culturing these cells from patients, complete pieces of skin can be reproduced. These are extremely useful in the treatment of burns, bedsores or skin cancer. The culturing of 'diseased' skin offers the possibility of thoroughly studying diseases and testing new treatments.

The research was funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. "Wound Healers Cause Skin Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 October 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041012084302.htm>.
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. (2004, October 15). Wound Healers Cause Skin Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 14, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041012084302.htm
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. "Wound Healers Cause Skin Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041012084302.htm (accessed September 14, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Newsy (Sep. 14, 2014) The respiratory virus Enterovirus D68, which targets children, has spread from the Midwest to 21 states. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 12, 2014) Hundreds of children in several states have been stricken by a serious respiratory illness that is spreading across the U.S. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 12, 2014) The World Health Organisation warns that local health workers in West Africa can't keep up with Ebola - and among those countries hardest hit by the outbreak, the economic damage is coming into focus, too. As David Pollard reports, Sierra Leone admits that growth in one of the poorest economies in the region is taking a beating. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins