Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Quick Test For Drug-resistant Strains Of Gonorrhea

Date:
November 4, 2004
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
Potential antimicrobial resistance in the bacteria that cause gonorrhea can be detected without culturing the organism, thanks to a rapid test developed by researchers at Johns Hopkins.

Potential antimicrobial resistance in the bacteria that cause gonorrhea can be detected without culturing the organism, thanks to a rapid test developed by researchers at Johns Hopkins.

Related Articles


Key to the usefulness of the new test is that it does not require collection, culture or testing of the bacteria themselves - called Neisseria gonorrhea. Instead, the genes linked to resistance can be identified in urine samples or in leftover products from other commonly used diagnostic techniques, the Hopkins team reports.

This new application of probe technology should help public health officials study the spread of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea by simplifying analysis of samples that cannot be used for culturing organisms, the Hopkins group added.

The Hopkins team developed the test by using an existing diagnostic technology called nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). These are FDA-approved tests that detect gonorrhea DNA in urine samples. Using leftover DNA from NAATs, the team performed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to make copies of genes linked to resistance. They then performed a melt curve analysis to detect mutations in these areas. In melt curve analysis, a short DNA sequence that matches the bacterial sequence in question is labeled with a fluorescent dye. The labeled sequence, called a probe, emits light only when bound to its target.

The probe and the DNA copies produced by PCR are dissolved together and the solution is slowly heated and cooled. This lets the probe bind to its target. Then the solution is slowly heated until the probe is melted from its target. A special instrument measures the temperature at which the probe melts from the DNA by identifying the temperature at which the probe ceases to emit light. The probe melts at a lower temperature if the target contains mutations and at a higher temperature if there are no mutations in that region of the gene. As a result, the lower melt temperature indicates potential resistance.

Rapid detection and characterization of gonococcal resistance determinants in NAAT samples. Julie Giles, Justin Hardick, Jeffrey Yuenger, Charlotte Gaydos, Jonathan Zenilman


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "New Quick Test For Drug-resistant Strains Of Gonorrhea." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 November 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041104011824.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2004, November 4). New Quick Test For Drug-resistant Strains Of Gonorrhea. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041104011824.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "New Quick Test For Drug-resistant Strains Of Gonorrhea." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041104011824.htm (accessed March 30, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, March 30, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone in Ebola Lockdown

Sierra Leone in Ebola Lockdown

Reuters - News Video Online (Mar. 27, 2015) Millions of people in Sierra Leone are urged to stay at home in a three-day lockdown to help end the country&apos;s Ebola outbreak. Paul Chapman reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins