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The Evolution Of Phenotypic Polymorphism

Date:
April 17, 2005
Source:
University Of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
This new study, which will appear in the June 2005 issue of The American Naturalist, asserts that an individual could use his/her genotype as an informative cue when "deciding" which phenotype to develop. This is a new way of looking at certain kinds of genetic polymorphism.
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This new study, which will appear in the June 2005 issue of The American Naturalist, asserts that an individual could use his/her genotype as an informative cue when "deciding" which phenotype to develop. This is a new way of looking at certain kinds of genetic polymorphism.

Some species have alternative phenotypes, which are different categories of adult individuals specialized for particular circumstances. For instance, if predation risk is high in some local environments and low in others, one category might have a predation resistant phenotype, with protective devices like spines, whereas the other category lacks these devices and is instead more efficient at producing offspring.

If a developing individual can, statistically, predict the predation risk, it would be advantageous to develop the phenotype that fits the prediction. With spatial variation in predation risk, genetic determination of phenotypic alternatives can function as this kind of advantageous prediction, since natural selection will make genes for the protected type more common in local environments with high predation risk and less common in those with low risk.

Conceptually, this is the same as using some purely environmental cue signaling the presence of predators to infer the risk of predation. The evolutionary theory developed in this study suggests when genetic variation can function as an informative cue in this manner.

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Sponsored by the American Society of Naturalists, The American Naturalist is a leading journal in the fields of ecology and evolutionary biology and animal behavior. For more information, please see our website: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AN.

Olof Leimar (Stockholm University), "The evolution of phenotypic polymorphism: randomized strategies versus evolutionary branching" 165:6 June 2005.


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University Of Chicago Press Journals. "The Evolution Of Phenotypic Polymorphism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050416183740.htm>.
University Of Chicago Press Journals. (2005, April 17). The Evolution Of Phenotypic Polymorphism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050416183740.htm
University Of Chicago Press Journals. "The Evolution Of Phenotypic Polymorphism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050416183740.htm (accessed May 29, 2015).

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