Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Vietnam War Technology Could Aid Elephant Conservation

Date:
June 17, 2005
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
Seismic sensors developed to track enemy troop movements during the Vietnam war could help ecologists monitor and conserve elephant populations, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology. Dr Jason Wood and colleagues from Stanford University recorded vibrations caused by animal footfalls using a geophone buried near a path. Researchers were able to estimate the number of elephants passing the sensor by the size and frequency of their footfalls.

Seismic sensors developed to track enemy troop movements during the Vietnam war could help ecologists monitor and conserve elephant populations, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology.

Related Articles


Dr Jason Wood and colleagues from Stanford University recorded the vibrations from the footfalls of elephants and other large mammals, including giraffes, lions and humans, using a geophone buried near a path leading to a watering hole in Namibia's Etosha National Park. Because of the differences in the size and frequency of animals' footfalls, the researchers could tell with 82% accuracy when elephants were passing the geophone and estimate the number of elephants passing the sensor.

This is the first time geophones have been used successfully to detect and estimate elephant numbers. Another team tried to use a US Army surplus miniature seismic system to detect crop raiding Asian elephants in Sri Lanka, but the work was abandoned after the elephants began digging up the geophones and destroying them.

Making accurate estimates of elephant populations is essential for their conservation. Until now, ecologists have had to rely on counting elephant dung balls - a very time consuming and error-prone technique - or aerial census techniques, which although they are useful to estimate elephant numbers in open savanna cannot be used to spot elephants in dense forest.

As a result, the new technique could provide crucial data for reserve planning and management. "Conservation management would be improved by more accurate methods for monitoring and estimating the size of elephant populations or other large mammals in central Africa, as these populations are relatively small and threatened by poaching," Wood says.

The team will now work on improving the system by using an array of geophones which will allow them to use beam forming techniques. According to Wood: "Using a geophone array has additional advantages. Seismic equipment is designed for rugged field use and independent arrays can be buried and left in the ground to collect the data for as long as a month."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Vietnam War Technology Could Aid Elephant Conservation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050617172352.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2005, June 17). Vietnam War Technology Could Aid Elephant Conservation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050617172352.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Vietnam War Technology Could Aid Elephant Conservation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050617172352.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Anglerfish Rarely Seen In Its Habitat Will Haunt You

Anglerfish Rarely Seen In Its Habitat Will Haunt You

Newsy (Nov. 22, 2014) For the first time Monterey Bay Aquarium recorded a video of the elusive, creepy and rarely seen anglerfish. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Birds Around the World Take Flight

Birds Around the World Take Flight

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Nov. 22, 2014) An imperial eagle equipped with a camera spreads its wings over London. It's just one of the many birds making headlines in this week's "animal roundup". Jillian Kitchener reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Baby Okapi Born at Houston Zoo

Raw: Baby Okapi Born at Houston Zoo

AP (Nov. 20, 2014) The Houston Zoo released video of a male baby okapi. Okapis, also known as the "forest giraffe", are native to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Central Africa. Video is mute from source. (Nov. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins