Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Oysters: The Natural Way To Protect Our Shores

Date:
August 31, 2005
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
Oyster reefs would be a cheap, convenient, and natural way to protect shorelines from erosion.

A study published in the latest issue of Restoration Ecology finds thatin coastal Louisiana, oyster reefs help to deter erosion. Oyster reefsare self-sustaining, and are additionally attractive because they usenative materials, have the potential for long-term growth, andcontribute to overall ecosystem stability and quality. Oyster larvaemove in groups and water-borne chemicals stimulate the oysters'settlement; reefs are therefore able to maintain themselves as newrecruits settle and grow.

Related Articles


"Sustainability is an important component to note as maintenancerequirements would likely be reduced on created oyster shell reefs asopposed to other heavier shoreline protection structures (i.e.limestone rock breakwaters) which usually necessitate placement ofadditional material over time to maintain their effectiveness,"authors, Bryan P. Piazza, Patrick D. Banks, and Megan K. La Peyrestate.

The authors evaluated the effectiveness of six experimental shellreefs on both low and high wave energy shorelines in coastal Louisiana.The areas chosen were conducive to oyster habitation, evidenced by theabundance of oyster shells in surrounding waters. Measuring erosionover a year, the authors found that their small, fringing oyster shellreefs were effective in slowing erosion for low wave energy shorelines,though less effective in higher wave energy environments. The authorsconclude that "... the use of small created fringing oyster shell reefshas the potential to provide a useful shoreline stabilization tool tocoastal managers under low energy environments."

###

This article is published in the September issue of Restoration Ecology.

Restoration Ecology fosters the exchange of ideas among the manydisciplines involved in the process of ecological restoration.Addressing global concerns and communicating them to the internationalscientific community, the journal is at the forefront of a vital newdirection in science and ecology. It is published on behalf of theSociety for Ecological Restoration International.

Megan K. La Peyre is a fisheries biologist and assistant unitLeader in Fisheries for the U.S. Geological Survey, Louisiana Fish andWildlife Cooperative Research Unit. She is also an adjunct assistantprofessor in the School of Renewable Natural Resources and Departmentof Oceanography and Coastal Sciences at Louisiana State University.

Bryan P. Piazza is a Research Associate in the USGS CooperativeFish and Wildlife Research Unit at Louisiana State UniversityAgricultural Center, and is currently pursuing a PhD at LSU. He hasworked in coastal systems for 12 years as a researcher, resourcemanager, policy developer, and consultant.

Patrick D. Banks is the Biologist Program Manager in charge ofoyster resource management on over 1.64 million acres of public oystergrounds for the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. Heserves as the LDWF member on the Louisiana Oyster Task Force and is amember of the national Status Review Team (SRT) currently reviewing thepetition to list the Eastern oyster under the Endangered Species Act.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Oysters: The Natural Way To Protect Our Shores." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831074340.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2005, August 31). Oysters: The Natural Way To Protect Our Shores. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831074340.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Oysters: The Natural Way To Protect Our Shores." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831074340.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

EU Gets Climate Deal, UK PM Gets Knock

EU Gets Climate Deal, UK PM Gets Knock

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 24, 2014) EU leaders achieve a show of unity by striking a compromise deal on carbon emissions. But David Cameron's bid to push back EU budget contributions gets a slap in the face as the European Commission demands an extra 2bn euros. David Pollard reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Deep Sea 'mushroom' Could Be Early Branch on Tree of Life

Deep Sea 'mushroom' Could Be Early Branch on Tree of Life

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 24, 2014) Miniature deep sea animals discovered off the Australian coast almost three decades ago are puzzling scientists, who say the organisms have proved impossible to categorise. Academics at the Natural History of Denmark have appealed to the world scientific community for help, saying that further information on Dendrogramma enigmatica and Dendrogramma discoides could answer key evolutionary questions. Jim Drury has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Tornado Rips Roofs in Washington State

Raw: Tornado Rips Roofs in Washington State

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) A rare tornado ripped roofs off buildings, uprooted trees and shattered windows Thursday afternoon in the southwest Washington city of Longview, but there were no reports of injuries. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fast-Moving Lava Headed For Town On Hawaii's Big Island

Fast-Moving Lava Headed For Town On Hawaii's Big Island

Newsy (Oct. 24, 2014) Lava from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island has accelerated as it travels toward a town called Pahoa. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins