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New Study Finds Similarities Between Monkey Business And Human Business

Date:
May 3, 2006
Source:
University of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
Little attention has been paid to whether systematic economic biases such as risk-aversion are learned behaviors -- and thus easily ameliorated through market incentives -- or biologically based, arising in novel situations and in spite of experience. In a groundbreaking new study from the Journal of Political Economy, Yale researchers extend this question across species, exploring how a colony of capuchin monkeys responds to economic decisions. They found that monkeys doing business -- including trading and gambling -- behave in ways that closely mirror our own behavioral inclinations.

Little attention has been paid to whether systematic economic biases such as risk-aversion are learned behaviors -- and thus easily ameliorated through market incentives -- or biologically based, arising in novel situations and in spite of experience. In a groundbreaking new study from the Journal of Political Economy, Yale researchers extend this question across species, exploring how a colony of capuchin monkeys responds to economic decisions. They found that monkeys doing business -- including trading and gambling -- behave in ways that closely mirror our own behavioral inclinations.

"Traditionally, economists have remained agnostic as to the origins of human preferences," write M. Keith Chen, Venkat Lakshminarayanan, and Laurie R. Santos. "[But] if much of the fundamental structure of our preferences were so deep rooted as to extend to closely-related species, this would bolster the assumption of preference stability."

As part of the study, the researchers presented capuchin monkeys with two payoff-identical gambles: one in which a good outcome was framed as a bonus, and the other in which bad outcomes were emphasized as losses. Like humans, the monkeys displayed a strong preference for the first option, and like humans, the monkeys seemed to weigh the losses more heavily than comparable gains.

"Our results suggest that loss-averse behavior is a very general feature of economic choice," explain the authors. "Given our capuchins' inexperience with trade and gambles, these results suggest that loss-aversion extends beyond humans, and may be innate rather than learned."

JPE has been presenting significant research and scholarship in economic theory and practice since its inception in 1892. Publishing analytical, interpretive, and empirical studies, the Journal presents work in traditional areas--monetary theory, fiscal policy, labor economics, development, micro- and macroeconomic theory, international trade and finance, industrial organization, and social economics. For more information, please visit: www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE.

Reference: Chen, M. Keith, Venkat Lakshminarayanan, and Laurie R. Santos. "How Basic are Behavioral Biases? Evidence from Capuchin Monkey Trading Behavior" Journal of Political Economy, 114:3.


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The above story is based on materials provided by University of Chicago Press Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Chicago Press Journals. "New Study Finds Similarities Between Monkey Business And Human Business." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 May 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060503202659.htm>.
University of Chicago Press Journals. (2006, May 3). New Study Finds Similarities Between Monkey Business And Human Business. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060503202659.htm
University of Chicago Press Journals. "New Study Finds Similarities Between Monkey Business And Human Business." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060503202659.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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