Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Chronic Alcohol Exposure Can Affect Brain Protein Expression

Date:
August 31, 2006
Source:
University at Buffalo
Summary:
Researchers at the University at Buffalo studying the effects of alcohol on the brain, using zebrafish as a model, have identified several novel central nervous system proteins that are affected by chronic alcohol exposure.

Researchers at the University at Buffalo studying the effects of alcohol on the brain, using zebrafish as a model, have identified several novel central nervous system proteins that are affected by chronic alcohol exposure.

Related Articles


They also confirmed the involvement of additional proteins previously suggested as targets of alcohol toxicity, and observed abnormal behavior in the fish resulting from chronic alcohol exposure.

Results of the research appeared in the Aug. 15 online edition of the European Journal of Pharmacology.

Five proteins were found to be overexpressed and three were found to be underexpressed. These proteins are thought to be involved in critical mechanisms such as programmed cell death, cholesterol balance, amino acid metabolism, oxidative stress and signal transduction.

"Identification of proteins that show selective changes in abundance after alcohol exposure has the potential to unlock new pathways both for understanding the mechanisms of alcoholism and alcohol toxicity, as well as its amelioration," said Richard A. Rabin, Ph.D., professor in the UB Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and senior author on the study.

Senthilkumar Damodaran, doctoral student in pharmacology, is first author.

The study involved 16 long-fin striped zebrafish, in two trials of eight each, which were placed as a group in a tank with ethyl alcohol for four weeks. Rabin said the researchers chose zebrafish because they are easy to breed and maintain, their DNA sequences are similar to that of humans and they are sensitive to alcohol concentrations.

The concentration of alcohol used is similar to alcohol levels observed in humans, Rabin noted, and is comparable to levels reported in several rodent studies.

"Exposing the fish to alcohol for four weeks has the virtue of being a simple system," he said. "The ethanol concentration and length of exposure can be controlled tightly and applied identically to all

subjects. This method also prevents possible complications due to alcohol withdrawal." He noted, however, that it does not reflect the typical situation in humans.

Once in the alcohol solution, the fish were photographed digitally every 30 seconds, and every third image was stored for analysis. Zebrafish normally swim in a cluster in unison, so the procedure allowed nonintrusive monitoring of an inherent behavior.

Processes known as 2-D electrophoresis and MALFI-TOF mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins in the central nervous system that showed increased or decreased expression.

The photographs showed that after a week of alcohol exposure, the fish became less clustered and occupied a larger area of the tank. However, after two weeks of daily exposure, the cluster reformed and behavior returned to normal, suggesting the fish had become alcohol-tolerant.

The abnormal behavior, characterized by increased distance between fish in the group, returned after six weeks exposure, said Rabin, suggesting a progressive increase in behavior disruption.

"We don't know why this change occurred at this point," he said, "but it might indicate accumulated neurotoxic and neurodegenerative effects of chronic alcohol exposure."

Additional researchers on the study were Cynthia A. Dlugos, Ph.D., assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, and Troy D. Wood, Ph.D., professor of chemistry. The research was supported by UB's Interdisciplinary Research and Creative Activities Fund.

The University at Buffalo is a premier research-intensive public university, the largest and most comprehensive campus in the State University of New York.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University at Buffalo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University at Buffalo. "Chronic Alcohol Exposure Can Affect Brain Protein Expression." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 August 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060830075531.htm>.
University at Buffalo. (2006, August 31). Chronic Alcohol Exposure Can Affect Brain Protein Expression. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060830075531.htm
University at Buffalo. "Chronic Alcohol Exposure Can Affect Brain Protein Expression." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060830075531.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — Tryptophan, a chemical found naturally in turkey meat, gets blamed for sleepiness after Thanksgiving meals. But science points to other culprits. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) — Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins