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Squid Skin Reveals Hidden Messages

Date:
September 22, 2006
Source:
Marine Biological Laboratory
Summary:
In research published today in the journal Biology Letters, MBL (Marine Biological Laboratory) researchers Lydia Mäthger and Roger Hanlon present evidence that the polarized aspect of the skin of the longfin inshore squid, Loligo pealeii, is maintained after passing through the pigment cells responsible for camouflage.
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In research published in the journal Biology Letters, MBL researchers Lydia Mäthger and Roger Hanlon present evidence that the polarized aspect of the skin of the longfin inshore squid, Loligo pealeii, is maintained after passing through the pigment cells responsible for camouflage.
Credit: Image courtesy of Marine Biological Laboratory

In the animal world, squid are masters of disguise. Pigmented skin cells enable them to camouflage themselves—almost instantaneously—from predators. Squid also produce polarized skin patterns by regulating the iridescence of their skin, possibly creating a “hidden communication channel” visible only to animals that are sensitive to polarized light.

In research published today in the journal Biology Letters, MBL (Marine Biological Laboratory) researchers Lydia Mäthger and Roger Hanlon present evidence that the polarized aspect of the skin of the longfin inshore squid, Loligo pealeii, is maintained after passing through the pigment cells responsible for camouflage.

While the notion that a few animals produce polarization signals and use them in communication is not new, Mäthger and Hanlon’s findings present the first anatomical evidence for a “hidden communication channel” that can remain masked by typical camouflage patterns. Their results suggest that it might be possible for squid to send concealed polarized signals to one another while staying camouflaged to fish or mammalian predators, most of which do not have polarization vision.

Mäthger notes that these messages could contain information regarding the whereabouts of other squid, for example. “Whether signals could also contain information regarding the presence of predators (i.e., a warning signal) is speculation, but it may be possible,” she adds.

Mäthger and Hanlon maintain that the mechanism behind the transmission of polarized light through squid pigment cells warrants further study. Likewise, investigation of this masked polarization signaling system in squid and other cephalopods in natural environments would provide insight into animal camouflage mechanisms and may uncover similar examples in other species.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Marine Biological Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Marine Biological Laboratory. "Squid Skin Reveals Hidden Messages." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 September 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060920191616.htm>.
Marine Biological Laboratory. (2006, September 22). Squid Skin Reveals Hidden Messages. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060920191616.htm
Marine Biological Laboratory. "Squid Skin Reveals Hidden Messages." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060920191616.htm (accessed July 31, 2015).

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