Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

A Tumor Suppressor That Promotes Cancer Cell Growth?

Date:
October 9, 2006
Source:
American Journal of Pathology
Summary:
Researchers have shown that the tumor suppressor gene H-REV107-1 may actually stimulate tumor progression in some nonsmall-cell lung carcinomas. The related report by Nazarenko et al., 'H-REV107-1 stimulates growth in non-small cell lung carcinomas via the activation of mitogenic signaling,' appears in the October issue of the American Journal of Pathology.

Researchers have shown that the tumor suppressor gene H-REV107-1 may actually stimulate tumor progression in some non-small cell lung carcinomas. The related report by Nazarenko et al., "H-REV107-1 stimulates growth in non-small cell lung carcinomas via the activation of mitogenic signaling," appears in the October issue of The American Journal of Pathology.

Related Articles


Tumor suppressor genes function by regulating normal cell growth and proliferation. When a tumor suppressor gene is turned off, by mutation, deletion, or blocked expression, cell growth can proceed without safeguards, contributing to cancer cell proliferation. However, this appears not to be the case in some non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC), in which a tumor suppressor (H-REV107-1) actually promotes cancer cell growth.

Nazarenko et al. found H-REV107-1 expression in a portion of human NSCLC samples examined. When they further characterized this expression in relation to normal lung tissue, H-REV107-1 was found in nonproliferating and proliferating cells in normal lung tissue, localized mainly to the nucleus. In cultured NSCLC cells, however, H-REV107-1 was found in either the cytoplasm or both the cytoplasm and nucleus.

The group then examined whether cellular localization of H-REV107-1 in NSCLC tumor samples is linked with tumor behavior. Strikingly, cytoplasmic localization correlated with decreased patient survival (24 months versus 41 months for nuclear localization). These data suggested that cytoplasmic H-REV107-1 stimulates cell growth. This was then confirmed by suppression of H-REV107-1 RNA, which inhibited cell proliferation, and overexpression of H-REV107-1 protein, which stimulated cell growth pathways and increased proliferation.

These data demonstrate that H-REV107-1 exerts pro-growth functions within a subset of NSCLC cells in a location-dependent manner. Similar reverse functions have been identified for other tumor suppressors, but the correlation between H-REV107-1 expression and NSCLC patient survival is quite striking. The exact mechanisms that regulate H-REV107-1 activity are currently being investigated.

The possibility of using H-REV107-1 as a novel prognostic indicator of tumor aggressiveness is appealing. Lung cancer is responsible for more deaths than any other cancer, with only 15% of patients reaching 5-year survival, and non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 75% of all lung cancer.

This work was supported by Deutsche Krebshilfe and by the Berliner Programm zur Frauenfoerderung im Bereich der Natur-und Technikwissenschaften.

Work was directed by Dr. Christine Sers from the Institute of Pathology, Charitι University Medicine Berlin, Germany.

Citation: Nazarenko I, Kristiansen G, Fonfara S, Guenther R, Gieseler C, Kemmner W, Schafer R, Petersen I, Sers C. H-REV107-1 stimulates growth in non-small cell lung carcinomas via the activation of mitogenic signaling. Am J Pathol 2006 169:1427-1439

The American Journal of Pathology, the official journal of the American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP), seeks to publish high-quality original papers on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease. The editors accept manuscripts which report important findings on disease pathogenesis or basic biological mechanisms that relate to disease, without preference for a specific method of analysis. High priority is given to studies on human disease and relevant experimental models using cellular, molecular, biological, animal, chemical and immunological approaches in conjunction with morphology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Journal of Pathology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Journal of Pathology. "A Tumor Suppressor That Promotes Cancer Cell Growth?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061005164450.htm>.
American Journal of Pathology. (2006, October 9). A Tumor Suppressor That Promotes Cancer Cell Growth?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061005164450.htm
American Journal of Pathology. "A Tumor Suppressor That Promotes Cancer Cell Growth?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061005164450.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) — Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) — Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) — A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) — Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins