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Helping India Prepare For Impact Of Global Warming

Date:
April 15, 2007
Source:
Louisiana State University
Summary:
A science team has bee tasked with helping India, one of the countries facing the most dramatic consequences of world climate change. The team is developing an environmental observation system for India to help reduce risks and provide clear policies to guide the many coastal regions of the continent.

Growing concern over the potential impact of global warming has spurred action from Louisiana to India. Worries over increasing temperatures, melting polar ice caps and a lack of non-damaging fuel sources are slowly but surely beginning to affect policy at the international level. The potential repercussions of climate change on regional and global economies, public health, available water supplies and ecosystem services could be devastating. This is particularly true for developing countries, which tend to be ill-equipped for such changes.

Robert Twilley, associate vice chancellor of research and economic development at LSU, director of the Coastal Systems and Society Initiative and professor of coastal sciences, recently joined an international science team tasked with helping India, one of the countries facing the most dramatic consequences of world climate change. The team is developing an environmental observation system for India to help reduce risks and provide clear policies to guide the many coastal regions of the continent. An article co-authored by Twilley and other members of the group detailing the team's activities will appear in the April 13 issue of the journal Science.

Such an observation system could deliver the necessary scientific foundation for the development of long-term government policies that would help India meet its obligations under international accords such as the Kyoto Protocol, an agreement drafted by the United Nations calling for the voluntary reduction of greenhouse gases and emissions by all countries involved in the organization.

"National observation systems are critical to provide the best scientific understanding of a changing earth system for prudent policy decisions that influence our health, our security and our sustainable economies," said Twilley. "This is true in developed countries such as the U.S., and it's true of developing countries such as India."

India has one of the most populated coastal communities in the world with approximately 500 people per mile of coastline, compared to the U.S., which has approximately 30 people per mile. The country has historically experienced severe coastal threats, such as tsunamis, monsoons and cyclones in these areas of high population density. Such events are predicted to increase in number and severity if the global climate situation remains unchanged. The recent unprecedented growth of the Indian economy and population is expected to increase the country's greenhouse gas emissions and impact its natural resources unless drastic steps are taken.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Louisiana State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Louisiana State University. "Helping India Prepare For Impact Of Global Warming." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070413111521.htm>.
Louisiana State University. (2007, April 15). Helping India Prepare For Impact Of Global Warming. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070413111521.htm
Louisiana State University. "Helping India Prepare For Impact Of Global Warming." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070413111521.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

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