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Genes Determine Mate Choice, At Least For Fat Tailed Dwarf Lemurs

Date:
October 4, 2007
Source:
Forschungsverbund Berlin
Summary:
How do we choose our mates? For quite some time now, scientists suspect that it is not for looks or fashion, neither for love or sympathy. It may be the genes that determine our preference for certain males or females. A new study provides support for this idea by looking at lemurs in Madagascar. Female fat-tailed dwarf lemurs live in life-long pairs, yet notoriously cheat on their partners to improve the genetic fitness of their offspring.

A fat-tailed dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius) on Madagaskar: A study shows that nearly half of their offspring results from "cuckolding". Picture by Simone Sommer
Credit: Image courtesy of Forschungsverbund Berlin

How do we choose our mates? For quite some time now, scientists suspect that it is not for looks or fashion, neither for love or sympathy. It may be the genes that determine our preference for certain males or females.

A new study provides support for this idea by looking at lemurs in Madagascar.

Female fat-tailed dwarf lemurs (Cheirogaleus medius) live in life-long pairs, yet notoriously cheat on their partners to improve the genetic fitness of their offspring.

The team headed by Prof. Simone Sommer looked for possible genetic benefits in the obligate pair-living fat-tailed dwarf lemur which maintains life-long pair bonds but has an extremely high rate of extra-pair paternity.

Possible mechanisms of female mate choice were investigated by analyzing overall genetic variability as well as a marker of adaptive significance (major histocompatibility complex, MHC-DRB exon 2). MHC-genes determine not only the individual’s immune response but also the individual’s body odour. This holds true for animals as well as for humans.

The study indicated that females preferred males both as social and as genetic fathers for their offspring if they have a higher number of MHC-alleles and MHC-supertypes, a lower overlap with the female’s MHC-supertypes as well as a higher genome-wide heterozygosity than randomly assigned males. This means that females looked for the most genetically different males preferably with a “healthy” set of genes. Mutual relatedness had no influence on mate choice.

Interestingly, females were most likely to cheat on their social partner if he had a higher overlap with the female’s MHC supertype. Extra-pair mates were chosen mostly for their genetic difference, thus maximising the genetic complementarity of sires to the females.

Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin published the study in the journal Evolutionary Ecology .

Reference: Nina Schwensow et al.: MHC-associated mating strategies and the importance of overall genetic diversity in an obligate pair-living primate (in Evolutionary Ecology; DOI 10.1007/s10682-007-9186-4).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Forschungsverbund Berlin. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Schwensow et al. MHC-associated mating strategies and the importance of overall genetic diversity in an obligate pair-living primate. Evolutionary Ecology, 2007; DOI: 10.1007/s10682-007-9186-4

Cite This Page:

Forschungsverbund Berlin. "Genes Determine Mate Choice, At Least For Fat Tailed Dwarf Lemurs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070929163433.htm>.
Forschungsverbund Berlin. (2007, October 4). Genes Determine Mate Choice, At Least For Fat Tailed Dwarf Lemurs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070929163433.htm
Forschungsverbund Berlin. "Genes Determine Mate Choice, At Least For Fat Tailed Dwarf Lemurs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070929163433.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

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