Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Vaccine Against Malaria Will Reduce Disease, Study Suggests

Date:
December 28, 2007
Source:
Case Western Reserve University
Summary:
Researchers have just published data potentially impacting the three billion people exposed to malaria every year. Novel findings show that new antibodies inhibit infection by the Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) malaria parasite.

The late stage of the malaria parasite, P. vivax: the Duffy binding protein (green) and DNA (blue).
Credit: Image courtesy of Case Western Reserve University

Today, researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine's Center for Global Health & Diseases published data potentially having a strong effect on the three billion people exposed to malaria every year. These novel findings show new antibodies inhibit infection by the Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) malaria parasite.

The research suggests a Duffy binding protein-based vaccine could provide protection against malaria blood-stage infection. This specific protein is an attractive candidate for a P. vivax vaccine, as it could decrease illness in malaria-prevalent regions. For the first time, scientists from the eight partner institutions along with the Center for Global Health & Diseases, conclusively proved that infiltration invasion of human red blood cells by the malaria parasite could be prevented by these antibodies.

Unlike other types of malaria, a P. vivax infection relies solely upon on the single molecular interaction between the Duffy antigen on human red blood cells and the Duffy binding protein expressed by the parasite to establish the disease. By interrupting the interaction of parasite binding to the red cell, the researchers and their colleagues around the United States and in Papua New Guinea, India, and Thailand, have the potential to eliminate P. vivax malaria. By exploiting this required interaction, the research offers a clear path toward development of a P. vivax malaria vaccine.

James W. Kazura, director of the Center for the Case Western Reserve University Center for Global Health and Diseases, emphasized "P. vivax is widely distributed throughout Asia, the South Pacific, parts of Africa and South America. However, the importance of developing a vaccine against vivax malaria to the American public is underscored by the fact that this form of malaria is transmitted in Afghanistan, Iraq and adjoining regions where our troops are stationed."

For more than 50 years the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine has dedicated significant effort to the field of international health. This emphasis was initiated by the late Frederick C. Robbins, dean of School of Medicine from 1966 to 1980, and Nobel laureate for discovering methods that led to development of the polio vaccine.

Malaria, deemed one of the world's "big three" diseases, along with tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, kills one million people every year. Currently, there are 70 million cases of P. vivax worldwide. The disease's prevalence has increased in recent years through the worldwide spread of drug resistance, which is why a vaccine is desperately needed. The research at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is particularly encouraging because it offers one of the first feasible vaccine concepts to the most common form of malaria.

This research by Brian T. Grimberg, Peter A. Zimmerman and Christopher L. King is published in the December issue of Public Library of Science Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Case Western Reserve University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Case Western Reserve University. "Vaccine Against Malaria Will Reduce Disease, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071220111516.htm>.
Case Western Reserve University. (2007, December 28). Vaccine Against Malaria Will Reduce Disease, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071220111516.htm
Case Western Reserve University. "Vaccine Against Malaria Will Reduce Disease, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071220111516.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins