Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Discovery Of Lyme Disease Bug Clone May Explain Disease Spread

Date:
June 29, 2008
Source:
Stony Brook University Medical Center
Summary:
Scientists have discovered that a certain clone of Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, appears to be the most common strain causing Lyme disease in North America and Europe, and may account for the increase in cases for the past 20 years.

Benjamin Luft, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, and colleagues discovered that a certain clone of Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, appears to be the most common strain causing Lyme disease in North America and Europe, and may account for the increase in cases for the past 20 years.

According to Dr. Luft, Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States with more than 20,000 cases reported annually. While B. burgdorferi is the primary pathogen in the United States, clones of the pathogen are known to cause major disease. The ospC-A clone was one of the first strains ever identified.

In a new article, Dr. Luft and colleagues detail various methods of genetic testing of 68 B. burgdorferi isolates from Europe and North America. Based on the findings of their tests, the researchers concluded that the ospC-A clone dispersed rapidly and widely in the recent past and in both regions of the world.

“I believe this discovery will make an important contribution since it identifies an identical and high virulence clone of Borrelia in both Europe and North America,” said Dr. Luft. “This may explain the recent spread of Lyme disease in North America.”

The researchers report that the isolates of the clone were prevalent on both continents and uniform in DNA sequences, which suggests a recent trans-oceanic migration. More specifically, they explained: “The European and North American Populations of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto have diverged significantly because of genetic drift. Plasmid genes evolved independently and showed various effects of adaptive divergence and diversifying selection…genetic variation within the two continents contributed to most of the total sequence diversity, which suggests recent common ancestry, migration, or both, between the European and North American populations.”

The research was funded partly by the Lyme Disease Association and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Luft’s colleagues include: Wei-Gang Qui, Ph.D., and William D. McCaig, Hunter College of the City University of New York; John F. Bruno and Yun Xu of Stony Brook University; Ian Livey, Baxter Vaccine AG, Orth/Donau, Austria, and Martin M. Schriefer, of the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Stony Brook University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Wide Distribution of a High-Virulence Borrelia burgdorferi Clone in Europe and North America. Emerging Infectious Diseases, July 2008

Cite This Page:

Stony Brook University Medical Center. "Discovery Of Lyme Disease Bug Clone May Explain Disease Spread." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080626145806.htm>.
Stony Brook University Medical Center. (2008, June 29). Discovery Of Lyme Disease Bug Clone May Explain Disease Spread. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080626145806.htm
Stony Brook University Medical Center. "Discovery Of Lyme Disease Bug Clone May Explain Disease Spread." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080626145806.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) It's unclear whether the American Ebola patients' recoveries can be attributed to an experimental drug or early detection and good medical care. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins