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Can Biofuels Be Sustainable?

Date:
August 20, 2008
Source:
American Society of Agronomy
Summary:
With oil prices skyrocketing, the search is on for efficient and sustainable biofuels. Research published this month in Agronomy Journal examines one biofuel crop contender: corn stover. Corn stover is made up of the leaves and stalks of corn plants that are left in the field after harvesting the edible corn grain. Corn stover could supply as much as 25 percent of the biofuel crop needed by 2030.
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With oil prices skyrocketing, the search is on for efficient and sustainable biofuels. Research published this month in Agronomy Journal examines one biofuel crop contender: corn stover.

Corn stover is made up of the leaves and stalks of corn plants that are left in the field after harvesting the edible corn grain. Corn stover could supply as much as 25% of the biofuel crop needed by 2030.

Scientists with the USDA-ARS Agroecosystem Unit located at the University of Nebraska examined the long-term sustainability of using corn stover as a biofuel crop.

When corn stover is not harvested as a biofuel crop, it can be left on the fields to restore vital nutrients to the soil. Full-scale harvesting of corn stover may deplete the soil.

Researchers measured the soil organic carbon levels and residue production over 14 years in fields planted continuously with corn, continuously with soybeans, and with a rotation of corn and soybeans. Organic carbon rates were found to stay steady or even increase in all three field types.

Gary Varvel and Wally Wilhelm, who conducted the study, said "These results suggest that a portion of corn stover could be harvested for biofuel production without reducing soil organic carbon levels in high yielding systems. However, since this study did not study the direct impact of stover removal, that aspect remains to be evaluated."

Research into the effects of residue removal on soil organic carbon levels in several different cropping systems is ongoing at this and several other USDA-ARS locations throughout the U.S. Much of this research is under the auspices of a multi-location CRIS project within ARS called REAP (Renewable Energy Assessment Project).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Agronomy. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. G. E. Varvel and W. W. Wilhelm. Soil Carbon Levels in Irrigated Western Corn Belt Rotations. Agronomy Journal, 2008; 100 (4): 1180 DOI: 10.2134/agronj2007.0383

Cite This Page:

American Society of Agronomy. "Can Biofuels Be Sustainable?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080819160205.htm>.
American Society of Agronomy. (2008, August 20). Can Biofuels Be Sustainable?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080819160205.htm
American Society of Agronomy. "Can Biofuels Be Sustainable?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080819160205.htm (accessed May 26, 2015).

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