Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Second Site For Prostate Cancer Gene Found

Date:
September 4, 2008
Source:
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Summary:
Scientists studying a prostate cancer gene called HNF1B have found a second independent site within the HNF1B gene on chromosome 17 (17q12) -- increasing the number of genetic variants that may contribute to risk of developing the disease.

Scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues who are studying a prostate cancer gene called HNF1B have found a second independent site within the HNF1B gene on chromosome 17 (17q12) – increasing the number of genetic variants that may contribute to risk of developing the disease.

After comparing the newly-discovered site with a previously discovered site in the same gene among two large groups of patients in Sweden and at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, "these data strongly suggest that the two sites are genetically independent," said Jianfeng Xu, M.D., Dr. Ph.H., senior researcher on the study.

"We found another genetic variant associated with prostate cancer risk," Xu said. "The more genetic variants we discover, the better off we are. As we find more of these, it improves our ability to predict prostate cancer risk."

Xu, a professor of epidemiology and cancer biology and Director of the Center for Cancer Genomics, reported the results with 30 colleagues in the current on-line version of Nature Genetics.

The researchers conducted what they termed a "fine-mapping study" in the two groups, one called CAPS, from Sweden, that had 2,899 prostate cancer cases and 1,722 control participants, and the Johns Hopkins study that had 1,527 prostate cancer patients and 482 control participants.

They found two separate clusters of prostate-cancer-associated SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), one in a region previously identified and one in a new region. The researchers then worked to see whether the genetic variants were associated with risk of developing the disease. They looked at the same locations in five other large studies of prostate cancer patients and found that prostate cancer risk was higher among men who had the genetic variants.

Earlier this year, the same research group reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that genetic variants have a strong cumulative effective. A man with four of the five previously discovered variants has a 400 percent increased risk of developing prostate cancer compared to men with none of the variants.

Xu said that as the number of genetic variants associated with prostate cancer risk continues to mount, it improves the precision of risk prediction. But he predicted that prostate cancer will be found to be polygenic, "not dependent on one gene, but a group of genes."

Prostate cancer risk might be plotted on a bell-shaped curve, with men with a family history of the disease and multiple variants being at the upper end of the curve.

The researchers are exploring another finding, that the HNF1B gene is also associated with diabetes. But if a patient with the HNF1B gene has diabetes, the prostate cancer risk decreases, "We still don't know how," Xu said.

Collaborating with Xu were William B. Isaacs, Ph.D., from the Department of Urology at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, and Henrik Grφnberg, M.D., Ph.Dl, from Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

Jielin Sun, Ph.D., and S. Lilly Zheng, M.D., of the Center for Cancer Genomics and the Center for Human Genomics at Wake Forest, are co-first authors of the paper. Additional co-authors from Wake Forest's cancer genomics and human genomics centers are Lina D. Purcell, M.S., Zhengrong Gao, B.S., Seong-Tae Kim, Ph.D., Wennuan Liu, Ph.D., Yi Zhu, B.S., Latchezar Dimitrov, M.S., Jishan Sun, Ph.D., Tao Li, M.D., Ph.D., Aubrey R. Turner, M.S., Tamara S. Adams, M.S., and Bao-Li Chang, Ph.D. Fang-Chi Hsu is from the Department of Biostatistical Sciences at Wake Forest.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Second Site For Prostate Cancer Gene Found." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080902122852.htm>.
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. (2008, September 4). Second Site For Prostate Cancer Gene Found. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080902122852.htm
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Second Site For Prostate Cancer Gene Found." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080902122852.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) — Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) — The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) — Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) — Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:  

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile iPhone Android Web
    Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins