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First Evidence That Common Pollutant May Reduce Iodine Levels In Breast Milk

Date:
October 13, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Researchers in Texas are reporting the first evidence from human studies that perchlorate, a common pollutant increasingly found in food and water, may interfere with an infant's availability of iodine in breast milk. Iodine deficiency in infants can cause mental retardation and other health problems, the scientists note. The study also provides further evidence that iodine intake in U.S. mothers is low and that perchlorate may play a key role.

Researchers in Texas are reporting the first evidence from human studies that perchlorate, a common pollutant increasingly found in food and water, may interfere with an infant's availability of iodine in breast milk. Iodine deficiency in infants can cause mental retardation and other health problems, the scientists note. The study also provides further evidence that iodine intake in U.S. mothers is low and that perchlorate may play a key role.

Purnendu Dasgupta and colleagues note that perchlorate occurs naturally in the soil and is also manufactured as a rocket fuel and explosive ingredient. Past studies showed that perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake. However, scientists did not know its effects on iodine levels in the milk of nursing mothers.

To find out, the researchers collected breast milk samples from 13 breastfeeding mothers and measured their content of iodine, perchlorate, and thiocyanate, another iodine inhibitor found in certain foods. The study showed that if these breast milk samples were fed to infants, 12 of 13 infants would not have an adequate intake of iodine. It also showed that nine of the infants would have ingested perchlorate at a level exceeding those considered safe by the National Academy of Sciences. "Even though the number of subjects was not large, in terms of the number of total samples analyzed, this is the most extensive study on the topic," the researchers say, adding that the low iodine levels are "disconcerting."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Purnendu K. Dasgupta et al. Intake of Iodine and Perchlorate and Excretion in Human Milk. Environmental Science & Technology, September 17, 2008 DOI: 10.1021/es801549w

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "First Evidence That Common Pollutant May Reduce Iodine Levels In Breast Milk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081013105309.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, October 13). First Evidence That Common Pollutant May Reduce Iodine Levels In Breast Milk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081013105309.htm
American Chemical Society. "First Evidence That Common Pollutant May Reduce Iodine Levels In Breast Milk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081013105309.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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