Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Biosynthetics Production With Detours

Date:
November 5, 2008
Source:
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres
Summary:
Scientists have achieved an important advance in better understanding metabolic pathways in bacteria. Using computer models, they calculated the genetic changes that are necessary for increasing the production of biosynthetics in the Pseudomonas putida bacteria.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum fόr Infektionsforschung (HZI) in Braunschweig, Germany have achieved an important advance in better understanding metabolic pathways in bacteria and their use. Using computer models, the "System and Synthetic Biology" working group, headed up by Vνtor Martins dos Santos, calculated the genetic changes that are necessary for increasing the production of biosynthetics in the Pseudomonas putida bacteria.

Experiments in the laboratory subsequently confirmed the results. With this, the creation of natural synthetics could be increased in a targeted manner in the future.

Pseudonomads are bacteria that occur everywhere in our environment. Their changeable and flexible metabolism makes it possible for them to live in different habitats, in water, in soil, on plants and in animals. Among these pseudonomads, there are exponents that can be used in biotechnology. These include Pseudomonas putida: It produces chemicals, pharmaceutical products, degrades waste and toxins. It also plays an important role in manufacturing high-quality substances for industry.

Now, in cooperation with a working group at the Virginia University in America, the researchers working with Martins dos Santos searched for possibilities of increasing the production of natural materials in P. putida. For this, they chose the chemical compound, polyhydroxy butanoic acid (PHB): It is one of the important biosynthetics, which could play a major role in medicine and industry in the future. From it, seam materials, screws, adhesives or implants can be created, which dissolve after an operation or biodegradable packaging. In order to increase the yield of PHB in P. putida, the researchers developed a mathematical model.

However, the path toward such a model is long and drawn-out. "When sequencing the genome of an organism, you frequently do not know what the individual genes mean and how their interaction functions", says Martins dos Santos. Based on computer models and knowledge from databases, the researchers created a network of individual genes and metabolic processes in P. putida. "All of this is similar to a map with cities and motorways", say, Jacek Puchałka, a colleague in Martins dos Santos' working group. "On some roads, there is a great deal of traffic, while others are very quiet. Some roads are blocked and then there are detours. The metabolic paths in P. putida behave in exactly the same way."

The researchers took advantage of the ability of bacteria to divert their metabolic paths, if a path is disrupted by mutations. The computer model shows which paths need to be changed in P. putida, in order to increase the yield of PHB. This is important for industry: Currently, the production of PHB is still very long and drawn-out and really not justifiable against the oil-based synthetics. "In future, it will be possible to manufacture biosynthetics more efficiently in large quantities. An if we have made our contribution to this, we are very pleased", says Puchałka.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Puchalka et al. Genome-Scale Reconstruction and Analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Metabolic Network Facilitates Applications in Biotechnology. PLoS Computational Biology, 2008; 4 (10): e1000210 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000210

Cite This Page:

Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. "Biosynthetics Production With Detours." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081031112043.htm>.
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. (2008, November 5). Biosynthetics Production With Detours. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081031112043.htm
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. "Biosynthetics Production With Detours." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081031112043.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Washington Wildlife Center Goes Nuts Over Baby Squirrels

Washington Wildlife Center Goes Nuts Over Baby Squirrels

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) — An animal rescue in Washington state receives an influx of orphaned squirrels, keeping workers busy as they nurse them back to health. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Drug ZMapp Cures Lab Monkeys Of Disease

Experimental Ebola Drug ZMapp Cures Lab Monkeys Of Disease

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) — In a new study, a promising experimental treatment for Ebola managed to cure a group of infected macaque monkeys. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) — State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins