Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scotland's Loch Leven On Road To Recovery After Decades Of Water Quality Problems

Date:
January 7, 2009
Source:
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
Summary:
New results from 40 years of intensive scientific research show that Loch Leven, Scotland’s freshwater ‘jewel in the crown’, is on the road to recovery after decades of water quality problems. The best water quality since restoration measures began was recorded during 2008.

Loch Leven, Scotland's freshLoch Levenwater 'jewel in the crown', is on the road to recovery after decades of water quality problems.
Credit: Image courtesy of Centre for Ecology and Hydrology

New results from 40 years of intensive scientific research show that Loch Leven, Scotland’s freshwater ‘jewel in the crown’, is on the road to recovery after decades of water quality problems. The best water quality since restoration measures began was recorded during 2008.

Related Articles


The conclusions will be presented at a symposium in Kinross, Scotland on 11 December 2008 by scientists from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology who have carried out a detailed water quality monitoring programme at Loch Leven since 1968.

Ecology and water chemistry monitoring has been undertaken at Loch Leven every other week since 1968 along with studies of aquatic plants, fish and birds. The latest results show that algal blooms are now less frequent, underwater plants are thriving again in the clearer water, and there has been a marked improvement in the fishery.

Dr Linda May, from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, who has led the monitoring programme for the last fifteen years, said, “The lessons learnt from long term research at Loch Leven are helping managers improve water quality in shallow lakes across the world. The monitoring programme has given us a better understanding of the links between pollution, climate change and ecological response which has ultimately led to the successful restoration of Loch Leven, the largest shallow loch in lowland Scotland.”

The changes at Loch Leven have resulted from reductions in nutrient inputs from farming, industry and sewage. These came about as a result of water quality targets set in the 1990s, based on scientific evidence provided by the long term monitoring programme.

Over 100 people will attend the Kinross symposium from including representatives of the Scottish Government, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Natural Heritage, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, as well as many other organisations involved in the conservation and management of lakes within the UK.

Dr May added, “The Loch Leven work is remarkable, not just for its long term nature and its focus on integrating science, policy and management, but also because of the wide range of organisations and individuals that have been instrumental in maintaining the monitoring programme and implementing the restoration programme.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. "Scotland's Loch Leven On Road To Recovery After Decades Of Water Quality Problems." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081211081811.htm>.
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. (2009, January 7). Scotland's Loch Leven On Road To Recovery After Decades Of Water Quality Problems. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081211081811.htm
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. "Scotland's Loch Leven On Road To Recovery After Decades Of Water Quality Problems." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081211081811.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How A Chorus Led Scientists To A New Frog Species

How A Chorus Led Scientists To A New Frog Species

Newsy (Oct. 30, 2014) A frog noticed by a conservationist on New York's Staten Island has been confirmed as a new species after extensive study and genetic testing. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Hawaii Lava Inches Closer

Raw: Hawaii Lava Inches Closer

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) Aerial video shows the path lava has carved across a portion of Hawaii's big island, threatening homes in the town of Pahoa. Officials say the flow was just over 230 yards from a roadway Thursday morning. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Hawaii Lava Approaching Village Road

Raw: Hawaii Lava Approaching Village Road

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) The lava flow on the Big Island of Hawaii was 225 yards from Pahoa Village Road on Wednesday night. The lava is slowing down but still approaching the village. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Endangered Carpathian Ponies Are Making a Comeback in Poland

Endangered Carpathian Ponies Are Making a Comeback in Poland

AFP (Oct. 29, 2014) At the foot of the rugged Carpathian mountains near the Polish-Ukrainian border, ranchers and scientists are trying to protect the Carpathian pony, known as the Hucul in Polish. Duration: 02:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins