Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Healthy Food Availability Could Depend On Where You Live, As Does The Quality Of Your Diet

Date:
February 27, 2009
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Summary:
The availability of healthy food choices and your quality of diet is associated with where you live. Researchers examined healthy food availability and diet quality among Baltimore City and Baltimore County, Md., residents and found that availability of healthy foods was associated with quality of diet and 46 percent of lower-income neighborhoods had a low availability of healthy foods.

The availability of healthy food choices and your quality of diet is associated with where you live, according to two studies conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Researchers examined healthy food availability and diet quality among Baltimore City and Baltimore County, Md., residents and found that availability of healthy foods was associated with quality of diet and 46 percent of lower-income neighborhoods had a low availability of healthy foods.

Related Articles


The results are published in the March 2009 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutritionand the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

“Place of residence plays a larger role in dietary health than previously estimated,” said Manuel Franco, MD, PhD, lead author of the studies and an associate with the Bloomberg School’s Department of Epidemiology. “Our findings show that participants who live in neighborhoods with low healthy food availability are at an increased risk of consuming a lower quality diet. We also found that 24 percent of the black participants lived in neighborhoods with a low availability of healthy food compared with 5 percent of white participants.”

Researchers conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the association between the availability of healthy foods and diet quality among 759 participants of a population-based cardiovascular cohort study, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Using a food frequency questionnaire, Franco, along with colleagues from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the University of Michigan and the University of Texas, summarized diet into two dietary patterns reflecting low and high quality diet. The availability of healthy foods was assessed by examining food stores within MESA participants’ neighborhood or census tract, their closest food store and all food stores within one mile of the participants’ residence. Availability of healthy foods in each food store was assessed by measuring the availability of items like fresh fruits and vegetables, skim milk and whole wheat bread as recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Their findings were reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Franco, along with colleagues from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the University of Michigan, examined the differences in the availability of healthy foods across 159 neighborhoods and 226 neighborhood stores in Baltimore City and Baltimore County. Researchers found that 43 percent of predominantly black neighborhoods and 46 percent of lower-income neighborhoods fell under the category of low availability of healthy foods versus 4 percent and 13 percent, respectively, in predominantly white and higher-income neighborhoods. In addition, supermarkets in predominantly white and higher-income neighborhoods had higher levels of healthy food availability compared to supermarkets located in lower-income neighborhoods and predominantly black neighborhoods.

“Previous studies have suggested that race and income are related to healthy food intake and our choice of foods play a major role in our health and diet,” said Benjamin Caballero, MD, PhD, professor at the Bloomberg School’s Department of International Health. "Our studies show that where you live is a major determinant of your health. The joint efforts of public health researchers in collaboration with community groups and policymakers will be required to effectively change the current picture of the less-than-optimal availability of recommended healthy foods."

The research was funded by the Center for a Livable Future at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Franco et al. Availability of healthy foods and dietary patterns: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2009; 89 (3): 897 DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.26434
  2. Franco et al. Neighborhood Characteristics and Availability of Healthy Foods in Baltimore. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2008; 35 (6): 561 DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.07.003

Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Healthy Food Availability Could Depend On Where You Live, As Does The Quality Of Your Diet." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090225132520.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2009, February 27). Healthy Food Availability Could Depend On Where You Live, As Does The Quality Of Your Diet. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090225132520.htm
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Healthy Food Availability Could Depend On Where You Live, As Does The Quality Of Your Diet." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090225132520.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins