Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Environmentally Friendly Beer Brewing: Repaired Gene Improves Commercial Lager Fermentation

Date:
April 22, 2009
Source:
American Society for Microbiology
Summary:
A recent study shows that beer fermentation conducted with genetically modified brewer's yeast may result in more efficient lager brewing and a lower environmental footprint.

A recent study shows that beer fermentation conducted with genetically modified brewer's yeast may result in more efficient lager brewing and a lower environmental footprint.

Researchers are from VTT Technical Research Center of Finland.

The use of more concentrated, high gravity and very high gravity (VHG) brewer's worts for the manufacture of beer has economic and environmental advantages. By using a special strain of brewer's yeast and adding more sugar, commercial brewers can create a beer with a higher alcohol percentage using the same amount of ingredients.

The resulting concentrated beer can be diluted with water to create a beer with the desired alcohol content. Current strains of brewer's yeasts, however, ferment VHG worts slowly and incompletely, leaving undesirable byproducts in the final beers.

Current research suggests that lager yeast strains possess a faulty gene that causes the brewing problems. Researchers repaired the lager yeast's genes by using DNA sequenced from an ale strain. The new yeast fermented VHG lager wort faster and more completely than unmodified strains, producing beers containing more ethanol and less unwanted byproducts.

"They [the transformed yeasts] fermented VHG wort faster and more completely, producing beers containing more ethanol and less residual maltose and maltotriose," say the researchers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vidgren et al. Improved Fermentation Performance of a Lager Yeast after Repair of Its AGT1 Maltose and Maltotriose Transporter Genes. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2009; 75 (8): 2333 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.01558-08

Cite This Page:

American Society for Microbiology. "Environmentally Friendly Beer Brewing: Repaired Gene Improves Commercial Lager Fermentation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090421101635.htm>.
American Society for Microbiology. (2009, April 22). Environmentally Friendly Beer Brewing: Repaired Gene Improves Commercial Lager Fermentation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090421101635.htm
American Society for Microbiology. "Environmentally Friendly Beer Brewing: Repaired Gene Improves Commercial Lager Fermentation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090421101635.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) — Tourists in Palau clamour to dive with sharks thanks to a pioneering conservation initiative -- as the island nation plans to completely ban commercial fishing in its vast ocean territory. 01:15 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Washington Wildlife Center Goes Nuts Over Baby Squirrels

Washington Wildlife Center Goes Nuts Over Baby Squirrels

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) — An animal rescue in Washington state receives an influx of orphaned squirrels, keeping workers busy as they nurse them back to health. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Drug ZMapp Cures Lab Monkeys Of Disease

Experimental Ebola Drug ZMapp Cures Lab Monkeys Of Disease

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) — In a new study, a promising experimental treatment for Ebola managed to cure a group of infected macaque monkeys. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins