Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Fruit Fly Gene Clone 'Library': P[acman] As New Research Tool

Date:
May 27, 2009
Source:
Baylor College of Medicine
Summary:
Using a specially adapted tool called P[acman], scientists have established a library of clones that cover most of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) and should speed the pace of genetic research.

Using a specially adapted tool called P[acman], a collaboration of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine has established a library of clones that cover most of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) and should speed the pace of genetic research.

In a report in the current online issue of the journal Nature Methods, Dr. Hugo Bellen, a professor of molecular and human genetics at BCM and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and his colleagues describe the new libraries.

P[acman]– developed by Dr. Koen Venken in Bellen's laboratory– allows scientists to study large chunks of DNA in living flies. The vector – officially P/phiC31 artificial chromosome for manipulation – combines different technologies: a specially designed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) that allows maintenance of large pieces of DNA in bacteria, recombineering that allows the manipulation of large pieces of DNA in bacteria, and the ability to insert the genomic DNA into the genome of the fly at a specific site using phiC31-mediated transgenesis.

Venken adapted the P[acman] vector to create genomic libraries, so that a researcher can choose a gene and find the corresponding clones in the library that cover that gene. Their collaborators at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Drs. Roger Hoskins and Joseph Carlson, played a key role in the design, construction, and annotation of the libraries.

"You can insert a single copy of a gene and rescue a mutation, or do a structure/function analysis of the gene," Bellen said. "If you don't know where the gene is expressed, you can tag it, put it back and locate where it is expressed."

Others who took part in this work include Karen L. Schulze, Hongling Pan and Yuchun He of BCM, Ken Wan (LBNL), Rebecca Spokony and Kevin P. White of the University of Chicago, and Maxim Koriabine and Pieter J. de Jong of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute in California.

Funding for this work came from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health and the BCM Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center.

The library is available at http://pacmanfly.org/.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Baylor College of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Baylor College of Medicine. "Fruit Fly Gene Clone 'Library': P[acman] As New Research Tool." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090524170643.htm>.
Baylor College of Medicine. (2009, May 27). Fruit Fly Gene Clone 'Library': P[acman] As New Research Tool. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090524170643.htm
Baylor College of Medicine. "Fruit Fly Gene Clone 'Library': P[acman] As New Research Tool." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090524170643.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) — You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Get A Mortgage, Receive A Cat — Only In Russia

Get A Mortgage, Receive A Cat — Only In Russia

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) — The incentive is in keeping with a Russian superstition that it's good luck for a cat to be the first to cross the threshold of a new home. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) — The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) — Tourists in Palau clamour to dive with sharks thanks to a pioneering conservation initiative -- as the island nation plans to completely ban commercial fishing in its vast ocean territory. 01:15 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins