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Infiltrating Blood-derived Macrophages Are Vital Cells In Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury In Mice

Date:
July 27, 2009
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Although macrophages are known as essential players in wound healing, their contribution to recovery from spinal cord injury is a subject of debate. Using a mouse model of spinal injury, scientists tested the effect of macrophages on the recovery process after injury.

Although macrophages are known as essential players in wound healing, their contribution to recovery from spinal cord injury is a subject of debate. Using a mouse model of spinal injury, Michal Schwartz and colleagues from the Weizmann institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel tested the effect of macrophages on the recovery process after injury and demonstrate an important anti-inflammatory role for a subset of infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages that is dependent upon their expression of the anti-inflammatory molecule interleukin-10.

These results suggest that this subset of macrophages may have a beneficial effect on spinal cord injuries.

Funding: MS holds the Maurice and Ilse Katz Professorial Chair in Neuroimmunology. The work was supported in part by the High Q Foundation, an NRSAD award, ERC award, and by IsrALS, given to MS. This work was supported also by the Israel Science Foundation, given to MS and SJ. SJ was supported by the MINERVA Foundation and by a joint ISF Bio-Med research grant, and is the incumbent of the Pauline Recanati Career Development Chair. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shechter et al. Infiltrating Blood-Derived Macrophages Are Vital Cells Playing an Anti-inflammatory Role in Recovery from Spinal Cord Injury in Mice. PLoS Medicine, 2009; 6 (7): e1000113 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000113

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Infiltrating Blood-derived Macrophages Are Vital Cells In Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury In Mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 July 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090727203631.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2009, July 27). Infiltrating Blood-derived Macrophages Are Vital Cells In Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury In Mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090727203631.htm
Public Library of Science. "Infiltrating Blood-derived Macrophages Are Vital Cells In Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury In Mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090727203631.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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