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Mango Seeds May Protect Against Deadly Food Bacteria

Date:
August 14, 2009
Source:
University of Alberta
Summary:
Life in the fruit bowl is no longer the pits, thanks to a Canadian researcher who has found a way to turn the throwaway kernels in mangos into a natural food preservative that could help prevent Listeriosis outbreaks.

New research has yielded a way to turn the throwaway kernels in mangoes into a natural food preservative that could help prevent Listeriosis outbreaks.
Credit: iStockphoto/Robert Lerich

Life in the fruit bowl is no longer the pits, thanks to a University of Alberta researcher.

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Christina Engels has found a way to turn the throwaway kernels in mangoes into a natural food preservative that could help prevent Listeriosis outbreaks like the one that killed 21 Canadians last year.

The findings can also apply to other fruit seeds like grapes, said Engels, who conducted the research to earn her master's degree from the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science at the U of A. The research is published in the latest Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Pure tannins, a plant component extracted from otherwise useless mango kernels by Engels, have proven inhibitory effects against various strains of bacteria including Listeria, a potentially deadly pathogen that infected some packaged meats and caused an outbreak of disease in Canada in 2008.

Engels' research focuses on a way to recycle wood-like mango kernels, which are usually thrown away or burned. "By processing the kernels for their tannins, businesses have a way to completely utilize all fruit parts and therefore increase their profit," she said. Currently, mangos are one of the main fruits marketed globally, ranked fifth in world production among the major fruit crops.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alberta. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Christina Engels, Matthias Kndler, Yuan-Yuan Zhao, Reinhold Carle, Michael G. Gnzle and Andreas Schieber. Antimicrobial Activity of Gallotannins Isolated from Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Kernels. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2009; DOI: 10.1021/jf901621m

Cite This Page:

University of Alberta. "Mango Seeds May Protect Against Deadly Food Bacteria." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090813163200.htm>.
University of Alberta. (2009, August 14). Mango Seeds May Protect Against Deadly Food Bacteria. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090813163200.htm
University of Alberta. "Mango Seeds May Protect Against Deadly Food Bacteria." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090813163200.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

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