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Antibacterial silver nanoparticles are a blast

Date:
May 25, 2010
Source:
Inderscience Publishers
Summary:
In a new article, researchers explain how blasting silver nitrate solution with an electron beam can generate nanoparticles that are more effective at killing all kinds of bacteria, including gram-negative species that are not harmed by conventional antibacterial agents.

Writing in the International Journal of Nanoparticles, Rani Pattabi and colleagues at Mangalore University, explain how blasting silver nitrate solution with an electron beam can generate nanoparticles that are more effective at killing all kinds of bacteria, including gram-negative species that are not harmed by conventional antibacterial agents.

Your running shoes, socks and even computer keyboard may be impregnated with silver nanoparticles that can kill some bacteria, keep you smelling sweet and preventing the spread of infection among computer users. Researchers in India point out that silver nanoparticles are not only antibacterial against so-called gram-positive bacteria, such as resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae but, also against gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is threatening human health the world over. Medicinal chemists are desperately trying to develop new compounds that can kill strains such as MRSA (methicillin, or multiple-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and E. coli O157. Frontline defenses, such as environmentally benign and cost-effective antibacterial compounds could prevent such infective agents spreading through contact with computer keyboard, phones and other devices.

Silver has been known to have antibacterial properties since ancient times. A modern technological twist means it has come to the fore for a wide range of applications because of the emergence of resistance to antibacterial gels. As such a new industry involving the production of bacteriostatic agents, including silver nanoparticles, has emerged.

Researchers have been experimenting with radiation to split silver compounds, releasing silver ions that then clump together to form nanoparticles. The incentive lies in the fact that such an approach avoids the need for costly and hazardous reducing agents and can be fine-tuned to produce nanoparticles of a controlled size, which is important for controlling their properties. Pattabi and colleagues have used electron beam technology to irradiate silver nitrate solutions in a biocompatible polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, to form their silver nanoparticles.

Preliminary tests show that silver nanoparticles produced by this straightforward, non-toxic method are highly active against S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rani M. Pattabi, Kandikere R. Sridhar, Srinath Gopakumar, Bhat Vinayachandra, Manjunatha Pattabi. Antibacterial potential of silver nanoparticles synthesised by electron beam irradiation. International Journal of Nanoparticles, 2010; 3 (1): 53 DOI: 10.1504/IJNP.2010.033221

Cite This Page:

Inderscience Publishers. "Antibacterial silver nanoparticles are a blast." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524101339.htm>.
Inderscience Publishers. (2010, May 25). Antibacterial silver nanoparticles are a blast. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524101339.htm
Inderscience Publishers. "Antibacterial silver nanoparticles are a blast." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524101339.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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