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What genes help blossoms last longer?

Date:
May 25, 2010
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
To help cut flowers and potted plants stay fresh longer, a plant physiologist is investigating the gene-controlled mechanisms of plants' aging.

ARS plant physiologist Cai-Zhong Jiang is using virus-induced gene silencing—which shows up as white patches on these purple petunias—to determine the function of genes involved in how long a plant flowers.
Credit: Photo by Peggy Greb

Some cut flowers and potted plants are better than others at fending off the aging process, known as senescence. To help tomorrow's blooms stay fresh longer, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant physiologist Cai-Zhong Jiang is investigating the gene-controlled mechanisms of plants' aging. Such probing may eventually reveal how to modify flowers' aging-linked genes, or the proteins that are products of those genes.

Jiang is with the ARS Crops Pathology and Genetics Research Unit at Davis, Calif.

One approach, known as "virus-induced gene silencing" or VIGS, is allowing Jiang and colleagues to determine the function of genes in aging plants. In the laboratory, the scientists work with a naturally occurring microbe known as the tobacco rattle virus, modifying it by inserting plant genes of interest into it. In any given experiment, some flowering plants will not be exposed to the virus, while others will be exposed to either the unmodified or the modified virus.

Exposure triggers the plants' natural defense mechanism, including attempts to quash, or silence, the virus. When that happens, the genes that were inserted into the modified virus are also silenced. By comparing all of the plants, the researchers may be able to determine the newly-silenced genes' functions

In early, proof-of-concept experiments, Jiang and University of California-Davis professor Michael S. Reid used petunia as their model plant. They showed that inserting a piece of a color-imparting gene into the virus resulted in white sectors or splotches on a normally purple-flowering petunia. The plant's defense system had silenced the gene's normal function, which was to create color, according to Jiang.

A second gene fragment that the team also inserted into the virus was similarly silenced in the oddly white splotches. That silenced gene would normally have been involved in producing ethylene, an aging compound. But the white splotches on the plants exposed to the modified virus produced less ethylene than unexposed plants, or plants exposed to the unmodified virus.

Though VIGS has been used elsewhere to study the functions of genes in tomato and tobacco, the experiments by Reid and Jiang were the first to use VIGS to explore senescence mechanisms in commercially grown cut flowers and potted plants.

Reid, Jiang, and former graduate student Jen-Chih Chen describe their work in the 2009 book Petunia: Evolutionary, Developmental, and Physiological Genetics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. The original article was written by Marcia Wood. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "What genes help blossoms last longer?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524114045.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2010, May 25). What genes help blossoms last longer?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524114045.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "What genes help blossoms last longer?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100524114045.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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