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New radiation mechanism may ward off cancer, oil spills and terrorism

Date:
July 16, 2010
Source:
University of Central Florida
Summary:
Radiation similar to that used to treat cancer may someday help clean up environmental disasters such as the Gulf oil spill and detect explosive powder hidden underneath clothing.

Radiation similar to that used to treat cancer may someday help clean up environmental disasters such as the Gulf oil spill and detect explosive powder hidden underneath clothing.

The novel radiation mechanism developed by University of Central Florida physicist Richard Klemm and a team of scientists in Japan also could help doctors more directly target cancer and many other diseases, reducing the impact of treatments on healthy parts of the body.

The mechanism operates in the Terahertz gap -- the range between microwave and infrared frequencies. Until now, scientists have not been able to tap into these frequencies with much success.

"It's a small range, but these frequencies are the important ones absorbed by biochemical molecules," Klemm said.

Instead of simply using radiation to kill tumors, this technique may offer a more direct way track down what's ailing a patient. "Our mechanism could be used to detect the amino acids in DNA, which may be linked to specific diseases. That means it's a good diagnostic tool."

Medicine is just the beginning. The mechanism could be used to track miniscule traces of explosives hidden under clothing, a tool national security experts may find useful in preventing terrorist attacks. The technique also could be used to trace and potentially destroy specific chemicals that damage the environment and our bodies.

Results from the study have been published in Physical Review Letters.

"These applications are still years away, but this is significant progress and we're very excited," said Klemm, a pioneer in the field of layered superconductivity.

The co-authors of the study (Manabu Tsujimoto, Kazuhiro Yamaki, Kota Deguchi, Takashi Yamamoto, Takanari Kashiwagi, Hidetoshi Minami, Masashi Tachiki and Kazuo Kadowaki) are based at the University of Tsukuba. The city is home to more than 60 research institutes known for making breakthroughs in nanotechnology and physics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Central Florida. The original article was written by Zenaida Gonzalez Kotala. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Manabu Tsujimoto, Kazuhiro Yamaki, Kota Deguchi, Takashi Yamamoto, Takanari Kashiwagi, Hidetoshi Minami, Masashi Tachiki, Kazuo Kadowaki, and Richard A. Klemm. Geometrical Resonance Conditions for THz Radiation from the Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. Physical Review Letters, 2010; DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.037005

Cite This Page:

University of Central Florida. "New radiation mechanism may ward off cancer, oil spills and terrorism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100715105953.htm>.
University of Central Florida. (2010, July 16). New radiation mechanism may ward off cancer, oil spills and terrorism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100715105953.htm
University of Central Florida. "New radiation mechanism may ward off cancer, oil spills and terrorism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100715105953.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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