Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dogs' family status depends on family's locale

Date:
August 19, 2010
Source:
American Sociological Association
Summary:
Man's best friend might just be treated like any other animal depending on where the owners live. A new study found that people who think of animals as children tend to have a city background.

People who think of animals as children tend to have a city background.
Credit: iStockphoto

Man's best friend might just be treated like any other animal depending on where the owners live. A study by David Blouin, assistant professor of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Indiana University South Bend, found that people who think of animals as children tend to have a city background.

"To think of pets as just another animal is not uncommon in rural areas," Blouin said, "which makes sense given the utilitarian relationships people in rural areas are more likely to have with a range of different animals -- from farm to wild animals."

But no matter where someone lives, having children often changes the owners' thoughts on their pets.

"If you have kids, you have less time to spend with your pets," said Blouin, who discussed his study on August 15 at the American Sociological Association 2010 Annual Meeting. "That's part of it, but not the whole story. People who think of their pets as their children often re-evaluate this thought when they have human children of their own."

Here are some of the findings of Blouin's study, which involved pet owners in Indiana:

People often have very intense attachments to their pets and pets are often an integral part of their daily routines.

Ninety-three percent of dog owners and 77 percent of cat owners took their pets to the veterinarian at least one time a year.

Eighty-one percent of dog owners and 67.5 percent of cat owners spent two or more hours daily with their respective pets, while only 2 percent of dog and cat owners spent time with their pets less than every day.

In interviews many of the pet owners confided that their pet's health was a major concern, especially as their animals got older. Some admitted that they spent significant sums of money on their pet's health, addressing routine care, such as vaccinations, as well more serious conditions such as skin allergies, Crohn's disease and diabetes.

The frequency of interactions owners had with their pets, as well as how often they took them to the veterinarian, were closely tied to how owners viewed their pets -- whether as a child, a companion, or just another, albeit, useful animal, Blouin said.

The study was entitled "'I Can't Be Without a Dog!' Understanding Variations in Interactions and Relationships with Pets."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Sociological Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Sociological Association. "Dogs' family status depends on family's locale." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100815162124.htm>.
American Sociological Association. (2010, August 19). Dogs' family status depends on family's locale. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100815162124.htm
American Sociological Association. "Dogs' family status depends on family's locale." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100815162124.htm (accessed April 25, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Friday, April 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) Scientists say for the extremely elderly, their stem cells might reach a state of exhaustion. This could limit one's life span. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Kangaroo Rescued from Swimming Pool

Raw: Kangaroo Rescued from Swimming Pool

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A kangaroo was saved from drowning in a backyard suburban swimming pool in Australia's Victoria state on Thursday. Australian broadcaster Channel 7 showed footage of the kangaroo struggling to get out of the pool. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Marijuana Use Lead To Serious Heart Problems?

Could Marijuana Use Lead To Serious Heart Problems?

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) A new study says marijuana use could lead to serious heart-related complications. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins