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Oil in Gulf of Mexico: Biologists cite need for critical data to determine ecological consequences

Date:
February 4, 2011
Source:
University of Florida
Summary:
Twenty years after biologists attempted to determine the ecological damages to marine life from the Exxon Valdez oil spill, scientists dealing with the BP disaster find themselves with the same problem: the lack of critical data to determine the ecological consequences of human-induced environmental disasters.
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Twenty years after biologists attempted to determine the ecological damages to marine life from the Exxon Valdez oil spill, scientists dealing with the BP disaster find themselves with the same problem: the lack of critical data to determine the ecological consequences of human-induced environmental disasters, a University of Florida researcher said.

Writing in the Feb. 4 issue of the journal Science, Karen A. Bjorndal, a University of Florida biology professor and director of the Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research, and other biologists said the United States needs "strategic national research plans for key marine species and ecosystems based on evaluation of cause and effect and on integrated monitoring of abundance and demographic traits."

"It is sad to see that we are in the same place now," said Bjorndal, adding that not much has changed since the Valdez oil spill when it comes to getting the data needed to assess and restore a marine ecosystem after an environmental disaster. She hopes it will provide an impetus for action.

"We know how to create these research plans -- what is needed now is the political will and leadership to do so," she wrote.

"Achieving mandated recovery goals depends on understanding both population trends and the demographic processes that drive those trends," Bjorndal's article states.

Her team argues it "is not too late to invest funds from BP to support teams of experts to develop effective strategic plans that identify, prioritize and provide methodologies for collecting essential data."

The team identified seven elements that need to be included in most of the plans.

"In the wake of the BP oil spill, the need for this policy shift is as clear as it is compelling. The largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history should provide the impetus and opportunity to effect this policy shift." Bjorndal wrote in her article.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Florida. The original article was written by Ron Word. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. A. Bjorndal, B. W. Bowen, M. Chaloupka, L. B. Crowder, S. S. Heppell, C. M. Jones, M. E. Lutcavage, D. Policansky, A. R. Solow, B. E. Witherington. Better Science Needed for Restoration in the Gulf of Mexico. Science, 2011; 331 (6017): 537 DOI: 10.1126/science.1199935

Cite This Page:

University of Florida. "Oil in Gulf of Mexico: Biologists cite need for critical data to determine ecological consequences." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110203163809.htm>.
University of Florida. (2011, February 4). Oil in Gulf of Mexico: Biologists cite need for critical data to determine ecological consequences. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110203163809.htm
University of Florida. "Oil in Gulf of Mexico: Biologists cite need for critical data to determine ecological consequences." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110203163809.htm (accessed May 29, 2015).

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