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Stem cell study could aid motor neuron disease research

Date:
March 7, 2011
Source:
University of Edinburgh
Summary:
Scientists have discovered a new way to generate human motor nerve cells in a development that will help research into motor neuron disease. Scientists have created a range of motor neurons -- nerves cells that send messages from the brain and spine to other parts of the body -- from human embryonic stem cells in the laboratory.

Scientists have discovered a new way to generate human motor nerve cells in a development that will help research into motor neuron disease.

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A team from the Universities of Edinburgh, Cambridge and Cardiff has created a range of motor neurons -- nerves cells that send messages from the brain and spine to other parts of the body -- from human embryonic stem cells in the laboratory.

It is the first time that researchers have been able to generate a variety of human motor neurons, which differ in their make-up and display properties depending on where they are located in the spinal cord.

The research, published in the journal Nature Communications, could help scientists better understand motor neuron disease. The process will enable scientists to create different types of motor neurons and study why some are more vulnerable to disease than others.

Motor neurons control muscle activity such as speaking, walking, swallowing and breathing. However, in motor neuron disease -- a progressive and ultimately fatal disorder -- these cells break down leading to paralysis, difficulty speaking, breathing and swallowing.

Previously scientists had only been able to generate one particular kind of motor neuron, which they did by using retinoic acid, a vitamin A derivative.

In the latest study, scientists have found a way to generate a wider range of motor neurons using a new process without retinoic acid.

Professor Siddharthan Chandran, Director of the Euan MacDonald Centre for Motor Neurone Disease Research at the University of Edinburgh, said: "Motor neurons differ in their make-up, so understanding why some are more vulnerable than others to disease is important for developing treatment for this devastating condition."

Dr Rickie Patani, of the University of Cambridge, said: "Although motor neurons are often considered as a single group, they represent a diverse collection of neuronal subtypes. The ability to create a range of different motor neurons is a key step in understanding the basis of selective subtype vulnerability in conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal muscular atrophy."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Edinburgh. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. R. Patani, A. J. Hollins, T. M. Wishart, C. A. Puddifoot, S. Αlvarez, A. R. de Lera, D. J. A. Wyllie, D. A. S. Compston, R. A. Pedersen, T. H. Gillingwater, et al. Retinoid-independent motor neurogenesis from human embryonic stem cells reveals a medial columnar ground state open. Nature Communications, 2, 214 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms1216

Cite This Page:

University of Edinburgh. "Stem cell study could aid motor neuron disease research." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110301122047.htm>.
University of Edinburgh. (2011, March 7). Stem cell study could aid motor neuron disease research. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110301122047.htm
University of Edinburgh. "Stem cell study could aid motor neuron disease research." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110301122047.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

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