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Scientists have new measure for species threat

Date:
April 10, 2011
Source:
University of Adelaide
Summary:
A new index has been developed to help conservationists better understand how close species are to extinction.

According to the authors of the SAFE (Species Ability to Forestall Extinction) index, conservationists with limited resources may want to channel their efforts on saving the tiger, a species that is at the 'tipping point' and could have reasonable chance of survival.
Credit: Copyright Juliane Riedl

A new index has been developed to help conservationists better understand how close species are to extinction. The index, developed by a team of Australian researchers from the University of Adelaide and James Cook University, is called SAFE (Species Ability to Forestall Extinction).

The SAFE index builds on previous studies into the minimum population sizes needed by species to survive in the wild. It measures how close species are to their minimum viable population size.

"SAFE is a leap forward in how we measure relative threat risk among species," says co-author Professor Corey Bradshaw, Director of Ecological Modelling at the University of Adelaide's Environment Institute.

"The idea is fairly simple -- it's the distance a population is (in terms of abundance) from its minimum viable population size. While we provide a formula for working this out, it's more than just a formula -- we've shown that SAFE is the best predictor yet of the vulnerability of mammal species to extinction."

Professor Bradshaw says SAFE is designed to be an adjunct to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species, not a replacement.

"Our index shows that not all Critically Endangered species are equal. A combined approach -- using the IUCN Red List threat categories together with the SAFE index -- is more informative than the IUCN categories alone, and provides a good method for gauging the relative 'safety' of a species from extinction," he says.

Of the 95 mammal species considered in the team's analysis, more than one in five are close to extinction, and more than half of them are at 'tipping points' that could take their populations to the point of no return.

"For example, our studies show that practitioners of conservation triage may want to prioritize resources on the Sumatran rhinoceros instead of the Javan rhinoceros. Both species are Critically Endangered, but the Sumatran rhino is more likely to be brought back from the brink of extinction based on its SAFE index," Professor Bradshaw says.

"Alternatively, conservationists with limited resources may want to channel their efforts on saving the tiger, a species that is at the 'tipping point' and could have reasonable chance of survival."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Adelaide. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gopalasamy Reuben Clements, Corey JA Bradshaw, Barry W Brook, William F Laurance. The SAFE index: using a threshold population target to measure relative species threat. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2011; 110330054251016 DOI: 10.1890/100177

Cite This Page:

University of Adelaide. "Scientists have new measure for species threat." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110407101615.htm>.
University of Adelaide. (2011, April 10). Scientists have new measure for species threat. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 15, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110407101615.htm
University of Adelaide. "Scientists have new measure for species threat." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110407101615.htm (accessed September 15, 2014).

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