Science News
from research organizations

Dangerous toxin discovered in critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal

Date:
June 8, 2011
Source:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Summary:
Researchers have discovered a potent and highly-debilitating toxin in the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, a first-of-its-kind chemical finding that is now prompting investigations of other marine mammals in the state.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Hawaiian Monk Seal swims in the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument.
Credit: NOAA

Researchers from NOAA have discovered a potent and highly-debilitating toxin in the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, a first-of-its-kind chemical finding that is now prompting investigations of other marine mammals in the state.

The toxin, ciguatoxin, is produced by marine algae common on coral reefs, and accumulates in fish species that are consumed by humans. Ciguatera, the human disease caused by ciguatoxin, affects thousands of people every year worldwide and comes in the form of acute gastrointestinal and neurological illness with symptoms resembling chronic fatigue syndrome.

The study reveals that Hawaiian monk seals, whose population is estimated at 1100-1200, are exposed to significant levels of these ciguatoxins. The threat could pose management challenges for this species that has been dwindling at four percent annually due to poor foraging success and additional environmental and human factors.

Monk seals were sampled throughout the Hawaiian Islands, including in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Samples were then shipped to NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science laboratory in Charleston, S.C. for toxin analyses.

"Based upon this study, we believe that ciguatoxin exposure is common in the monk seal population," said Charles Littnan, study co-author and scientist with NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. "This study is an important first step. However, we still need to understand more clearly how widespread exposure is and more importantly what role it may be playing in the decline of the species."

The study, conducted by marine toxin experts at NOAA's National Ocean Service in collaboration with veterinarians and ecologists at NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, was published this month by the American Chemical Society online in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marie-Yasmine Dechraoui Bottein, Lizabeth Kashinsky, Zhihong Wang, Charles Littnan, John S. Ramsdell. Identification of Ciguatoxins in Hawaiian Monk SealsMonachus schauinslandifrom the Northwestern and Main Hawaiian Islands. Environmental Science & Technology, 2011; 110517143313038 DOI: 10.1021/es2002887

Cite This Page:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "Dangerous toxin discovered in critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110608123004.htm>.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (2011, June 8). Dangerous toxin discovered in critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110608123004.htm
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "Dangerous toxin discovered in critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110608123004.htm (accessed September 3, 2015).

Share This Page: