Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hospitalizations due to skin and soft-tissue infections among children have doubled

Date:
August 17, 2011
Source:
University of California - Davis Health System
Summary:
The number of children hospitalized for skin and soft-tissue infections, most due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, has more than doubled since 2000, a new study has found.

The number of children hospitalized for skin and soft-tissue infections, most due to community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), has more than doubled since 2000, a study by researchers at UC Davis and elsewhere has found.

Related Articles


"Often parents don't recognize that their kid's abscess or other soft-tissue infections might be MRSA because the child hasn't been in nursing homes or hospitals, where you usually think of getting staph infections," said Patrick S. Romano, a professor of medicine and pediatrics at the UC Davis School of Medicine and the study's senior author.

"It's usually pretty easy to treat, if you treat it early and know what you're looking for," he added.

The study is published online in the journal Academic Pediatrics. It examines Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) data from over 40 states between 2000 and 2007, to track shifts in the reasons why children are hospitalized, and outcomes of those hospitalizations.

The findings of the study, called "The Annual Report on Health Care for Children and Youth in the United States: Focus on Trends in Hospital Use and Quality," are augmented by a recent AHRQ statistical brief, "Hospital Stays for Children, 2009," which tracked similar data through 2009.

Admissions for severe skin infections now rank as the seventh-most-common reason for hospital admission among children, up from 13th in 2000. The biggest jump came in the period from 2000 to 2005, which is attributable to the manner in which physicians treated MRSA, Romano said.

"In the early part of the decade, clinicians generally didn't recognize the growing prevalence of community-acquired MRSA," he said, differentiating between MRSA cases that occur in hospital settings or nursing homes, and the growing proportion of cases that occur in the community among otherwise healthy people. "Starting around 2005, physicians began treating community-acquired MRSA more effectively."

Romano said that hospitalizations likely will decrease once parents are better educated to look for signs of MRSA in their children and to seek early treatment for it. Without early intervention, hospitalization becomes more likely.

Romano said that the increase in the rate of hospitalization for MRSA among children is related to the increase in the prevalence of the bacterium in the community overall. Children who are infected with the bacterium may encounter it inside and outside their homes, he said.

"We don't generally recommend that parents be too compulsive about washing their houses down with antiseptic," Romano said. "Hand-washing is always an important precaution," he added.

Other conclusions in the report include:

  • A decrease in teen pregnancy hospitalizations, down nearly 25 percent since 2000;
  • A decrease in drug poisonings among teens aged 15-19, paralleling lower suicide rates, which have generally been on the decline since the mid-1990s;
  • A substantial decline in admission rates for asthma and diabetes, despite some increases in certain subpopulations;
  • A decrease in the rate of potentially preventable hospitalizations nationwide, fueled by a significant decline in admissions of children in the West and South;
  • A decline in hospital stay disparities between low- and high-income neighborhoods, even more so in the West and South;
  • Improvements in several measures of patient safety, including unintentional punctures of the lung during medical procedures
  • A gradually increasing role for Medicaid, which pays for nearly half of all children's hospitalizations nationwide.

The companion statistical brief also found that influenza increased dramatically as a major reported cause of hospitalizations for children 17 and under from 2000 to 2009, which could be due in large part to improved reporting. Together, the two papers serve as a baseline prior to the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, a key feature of which is an expansion of health insurance coverage.

Other study authors include Bernard Friedman, Terceira Berdahl and Roxanne Andrews, all of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Md.; Lisa A. Simpson of Academy Health, Washington, D.C.; Marie C. McCormick of the Department of Society, Human Development and Health of the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass.; and Pamela L. Owens of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the Department of Health and Human Services and of the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo.

The study was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the Department of Health and Human Services.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Davis Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Bernard Friedman, Terceira Berdahl, Lisa A. Simpson, Marie C. McCormick, Pamela L. Owens, Roxanne Andrews, Patrick S. Romano. Annual Report on Health Care for Children and Youth in the United States: Focus on Trends in Hospital Use and Quality. Academic Pediatrics, 2011; 11 (4): 263 DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2011.04.002

Cite This Page:

University of California - Davis Health System. "Hospitalizations due to skin and soft-tissue infections among children have doubled." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110817092229.htm>.
University of California - Davis Health System. (2011, August 17). Hospitalizations due to skin and soft-tissue infections among children have doubled. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110817092229.htm
University of California - Davis Health System. "Hospitalizations due to skin and soft-tissue infections among children have doubled." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110817092229.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins