Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mantis shrimp: Ocean floor critters communicate in synchronized rumbles

Date:
September 9, 2011
Source:
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science
Summary:
Mantis shrimp make noise with each individual seeming to have its own "voice" with which to communicate. The research team noted the "rumbles" were synchronized.

Watercolor.
Credit: Erica Staaterman

Understanding animal communication has long been a fascinating and vast area of research for those who dare to welcome the challenge. Some species use body language to express their message while others use calls and loud noises. In fact, some animals communicate in frequencies that are inaudible to humans, either above or below our hearing range.

But how do critters on the ocean floor use communication to fend off predators, attract mates and protect their homes? This was the question six scientists, including two students from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science, Erica Staaterman and Austin Gallagher set out to answer. Their destination was the muddy water off the coast of Catalina Island, California. Their subject was the California mantis shrimp Hemisquilla californiensis, a benthic crustacean that measures 8 to 10 inches.

"Rarely are there studies of benthic acoustics (sounds from the oceans floor)," said Staaterman. "There has always been suspicion that burrow-dwelling creatures like the mantis shrimp make some sort of noise, and our research is going to help us better understand life and communication on the ocean floor."

After collecting data using various instruments that included a coupled audio-video system, a hydrophone array and an autonomous recording unit, the team was able to develop theories about communication on the ocean floor.

The study uncovered the fact that mantis shrimp made noise, each individual seeming to have its own 'voice.' The males made rhythmic 'rumbles' in groups of three that may help to attract females to their burrows or defend their territories against neighboring males.

"These sounds recorded in the field were different than what we recorded in tanks, so to hear these creatures communicating in the wild was very special. Our research team noted the 'rumbles' were so synchronized that it sounded like a chorus, similar to that of groups of birds or frogs," she added.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. ER Staaterman, CW Clark, AJ Gallagher, MS deVries, T Claverie, SN Patek. Rumbling in the benthos: acoustic ecology of the California mantis shrimp Hemisquilla californiensis. Aquatic Biology, 2011; 13 (2): 97 DOI: 10.3354/ab00361

Cite This Page:

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. "Mantis shrimp: Ocean floor critters communicate in synchronized rumbles." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110908124500.htm>.
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. (2011, September 9). Mantis shrimp: Ocean floor critters communicate in synchronized rumbles. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110908124500.htm
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. "Mantis shrimp: Ocean floor critters communicate in synchronized rumbles." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110908124500.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Earth & Climate News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 24, 2014) The eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, mainly known for conflict and instability, is an unlikely place for the production of fine cheese. But a farm in the village of Masisi, in North Kivu is slowly transforming perceptions of the area. Known simply as Goma cheese, the Congolese version of Dutch gouda has gained popularity through out the region. Ciara Sutton reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

AFP (July 24, 2014) Health and agriculture development are key if African countries are to overcome poverty and grow, US software billionaire Bill Gates said Thursday, as he received an honourary degree in Ethiopia. Duration: 00:36 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Higgins Breaks Record at Mt. Washington

Higgins Breaks Record at Mt. Washington

Driving Sports (July 24, 2014) Subaru Rally Team USA drivers David Higgins and Travis Pastrana face off against a global contingent of racers at the annual Mt. Washington Hillclimb in New Hampshire. Includes exclusive in-car footage from Higgins' record attempt. Video provided by Driving Sports
Powered by NewsLook.com
Storm Kills Three, Injures 20 at Virginia Campground

Storm Kills Three, Injures 20 at Virginia Campground

Reuters - US Online Video (July 24, 2014) A likely tornado tears through an eastern Virginia campground, killing three and injuring at least 20. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins