Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New EU-South America research on Amazon die-back, climate and deforestation starts in October

Date:
September 26, 2011
Source:
Wageningen University and Research Centre
Summary:
Deforestation in the Amazon has been decreasing over the last 6 years, but it appears that the downward trend may have stopped, this year. Apart from deforestation, the Amazon rainforests are also reported to be sensitive to climate change. In turn, the forests play an important role in regulating climate, rainfall and South-American water supply. Are the Amazon forests, its waters, climate and society are under threat of degradation over the coming decades because of global climate change and regional deforestation?

Deforestation in the Amazon has been decreasing over the last 6 years, but it appears that the downward trend may have stopped, this year. Apart from deforestation, the Amazon rainforests are also reported to be sensitive to climate change. In turn, the forests play an important role in regulating climate, rainfall and South-American water supply. Are the Amazon forests, its waters, climate and society are under threat of degradation over the coming decades because of global climate change and regional deforestation?

Scientists from 14 European and South-American research institutes have started a new, ambitious research programme, called 'AMAZALERT' to forecast what may happen to the Amazon over the coming decades. Some reports have suggested that under continued climate change and deforestation the forests of the Amazon may be vulnerable to some form of die-back. The aim of AMAZALERT is to test how likely this prediction is, and if so, to forecast where in the region, when and how this may happen.

This team, led by Dr. Bart Kruijt of the Dutch Wageningen University and Research centre (Wageningen UR) and Dr. Carlos Nobre of the Brazilian National Space Research Institute (INPE) will design a system to detect the signs of widespread forest degradation and to enable early warning if irreversible forest loss appears likely. AMAZALERT will also evaluate the impact and effectiveness of public policies and measures to prevent Amazon degradation.

The 4.7 Million Euro AMAZALERT project, jointly funded by the European 7th Framework programme and national organizations, will hold an inaugural meeting from 3-5th October, at the premises of the Centre for Earth System Science of, INPE, in São José dos Campos, São Paulo state, Brazil.

Background

To reach its ambitious goals, the AMAZALERT team will bring together information available from previous work on regional climate, sensitivities of forests and the water cycle, deforestation, the impact of laws and human responses to change in the Amazon Basin. For example there is a wealth of observations from programmes such as the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) and simulations of global climate change, carried out for IPPC reports will be explored in detail as well.

However, models of climate, vegetation, and their interactions are constantly evolving and systematic information on the role of people and society in the functioning of the Amazon as a region is scarce. In particular, better understanding is needed of the feed-backs in the system, for example, the interactions between the changing land surface and the climate in the Amazon region. An important goal is to understand the workings and impact of the recycling of rainfall by the presence of forest. If this process altered, perhaps through large-scale forest loss, deterioration of Amazonia's ecosystems might follow.

AMAZALERT will also improve our understanding of the role of fire, and how people, agriculture and governments will respond to changes in the climate and environment. The team will directly involve stakeholders from institutions and governments to include their perspectives in modelling and to assist in development of a blueprint for an Early Warning System.

In 3 years' time, the project should provide a set of greatly improved tools to evaluate, and assist in decision-making on the future management of the Amazon region, including ways to monitor the functioning of the Amazon to avoid irreversible changes to its environment.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wageningen University and Research Centre. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wageningen University and Research Centre. "New EU-South America research on Amazon die-back, climate and deforestation starts in October." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926081904.htm>.
Wageningen University and Research Centre. (2011, September 26). New EU-South America research on Amazon die-back, climate and deforestation starts in October. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926081904.htm
Wageningen University and Research Centre. "New EU-South America research on Amazon die-back, climate and deforestation starts in October." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926081904.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) — He is leading a one man agricultural revolution in Mali - Oumar Diatabe uses traditional farming methods to get the most out of his land and is teaching others across the country how to do the same. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

3BL Media (Oct. 20, 2014) — Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-fuel Impala Video provided by 3BL
Powered by NewsLook.com
White Rhino's Death In Kenya Means Just 6 Are Left

White Rhino's Death In Kenya Means Just 6 Are Left

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — Suni, a rare northern white rhino at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, died Friday. This, as many media have pointed out, leaves people fearing extinction. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Organic Fertilizer Helps Reforestation of Monarch Butterflies’ Winter Retreat

New Organic Fertilizer Helps Reforestation of Monarch Butterflies’ Winter Retreat

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) — Using an organic fertiliser, a conservationist from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), leads an award-winning project to reforest the sanctuary of monarch butterflies. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins