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Citrus indica Tanaka: A progenitor species of cultivated Citrus

Date:
November 10, 2011
Source:
Pensoft Publishers
Summary:
Recent findings show that C. indica occupies a special taxonomic position as reflected from the Karyomorphological data generated by them.

Recent findings of researchers from the North-Eastern Hill University, India show that C. indica occupies a special taxonomic position as reflected from the Karyomorphological data generated by them.
Credit: Image courtesy of Pensoft Publishers

Recent findings of researchers from the North-Eastern Hill University, India show that C. indica occupies a special taxonomic position as reflected from the Karyomorphological data generated by them. The study was published in the open-access journal Comparative Cytogenetics.

A group of enthusiastic cytogeneticists (Marlykynti Hynniewta, Surendra Kumar Malik and Satyawada Rama Rao) from North Eastern Hill University show that C. indica occupies a special taxonomic position, as reflected in the karyomorphological data.

The genus Citrus is an economically important horticultural crop known for its fruit and juice. In India, there are about 30 species of Citrus of which at least nine species are available throughout India, while 17 species are confined to the North-Eastern states of India, which have been classified as a hot spot for Citrus biodiversity and are threatened in their natural habitat as per the criteria fixed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). Seven Indian Citrus species are considered endangered or nearly so, including C. Indica, C. macroptera, C. latipes, C. assamensis, C. ichangensis, C. megaloxycarpa and C. rugulosa.

C. indica (Tanaka, 1937) is supposed to be the most primitive species and perhaps the progenitor of cultivated Citrus. From the karyomorphological data it can be observed that the asymmetry index of different species of Citrus presently investigated had shown significant variation. C. medica, C. grandis and C. reticulata which are considered as true basic species are characteristic in having low asymmetry index of 1.87, 1.89 and 2.46 respectively. In the present investigation, the data from the karyomorphological observations on chromosome complements in 10 different Citrus species reflect that C. indica with its intermediate asymmetry index value (1.94) may be regarded as a true progenitor of cultivated Citrus.

This study also supports the previous report that there are three true species of Citrus, viz. C. grandis, C. reticulata and C. medica.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marlykynti Hynniewta, Surendra Kumar Malik, Rao Rama Satyawada. Karyological studies in ten species of Citrus (Linnaeus, 1753) (Rutaceae) of North-East India. Comparative Cytogenetics, 2011; 5 (4): 277 DOI: 10.3897/CompCytogen.v5i4.1796

Cite This Page:

Pensoft Publishers. "Citrus indica Tanaka: A progenitor species of cultivated Citrus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 November 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111110125834.htm>.
Pensoft Publishers. (2011, November 10). Citrus indica Tanaka: A progenitor species of cultivated Citrus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111110125834.htm
Pensoft Publishers. "Citrus indica Tanaka: A progenitor species of cultivated Citrus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111110125834.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

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