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First link between potentially toxic PFCs in office air and in office workers' blood

Date:
January 18, 2012
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists are reporting that the indoor air in offices is an important source of worker exposure to potentially toxic substances released by carpeting, furniture, paint and other items. Their report documents a link between levels of these so-called polyfluorinated compounds in office air and in the blood of workers.

In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists are reporting that the indoor air in offices is an important source of worker exposure to potentially toxic substances released by carpeting, furniture, paint and other items. Their report, which documents a link between levels of these so-called polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in office air and in the blood of workers, appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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Michael McClean and colleagues explain that PFCs, used in water-repellent coatings on carpet and furniture, may have adverse effects on human health. The substances are widespread in the environment and in humans around the world. Scientists know that potential sources of exposure include food, water, indoor air, indoor dust and direct contact with PFC-containing objects. But the link between levels in air and blood had not been explored previously, so McClean's group set out to fill that gap with a study of 31 office workers in Boston.

They found concentrations of a PFC called fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) in office air that were 3-5 times higher than those reported in previous studies of household air, "suggesting that offices may represent a unique and important exposure environment." In addition, the study found a strong link between concentrations of FTOH in office air and perfluorooctanoic acid (a metabolite of FTOH) in the blood of office workers. The results also suggested that workers in newly renovated office buildings may receive considerably higher doses of PFCs than workers in older buildings.

The authors acknowledge funding from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alicia J. Fraser, Thomas F. Webster, Deborah J. Watkins, Jessica W. Nelson, Heather M. Stapleton, Antonia M. Calafat, Kayoko Kato, Mahiba Shoeib, Verσnica M. Vieira, Michael D. McClean. Polyfluorinated Compounds in Serum Linked to Indoor Air in Office Environments. Environmental Science & Technology, 2012; 46 (2): 1209 DOI: 10.1021/es2038257

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "First link between potentially toxic PFCs in office air and in office workers' blood." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120118112003.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2012, January 18). First link between potentially toxic PFCs in office air and in office workers' blood. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120118112003.htm
American Chemical Society. "First link between potentially toxic PFCs in office air and in office workers' blood." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120118112003.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

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