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New means of safeguarding world fish stocks

Date:
May 22, 2012
Source:
Bangor University
Summary:
Powerful and versatile new genetic tools will assist in safeguarding both European fish stocks and European consumers. A new article details the first system shown to identify populations of fish species to a forensic level of validation.

Powerful and versatile new genetic tools that will assist in safeguarding both European fish stocks and European consumers is reported in Nature Communications. The paper reports on the first system proven to identify populations of fish species to a forensic level of validation.

With up to 25% of fish catches being caught illegally across the world, and with an estimated cost to Europe of up to €10 billion by 2020, the EU were eager to address the problems facing the European fishing industry. One major initiative was to fund the EU project behind the latest development: a three year, four million Euro pan-European project, called "FishPopTrace" led by Bangor University, UK.

The EU has already introduced a law requiring any fish sold in the EU to be identified with the species and region of origin on the label from 2011. The same regulation explicitly requires EU Member States to undertake pilot studies of novel traceability tools by 2013 to test the authenticity of this labelling. Furthermore, awareness and take up of the product is already in hand. In the UK, DEFRA is funding a pilot project to develop the tools to help UK fishing industry to collect, manage and store the samples to forensic standards.

Minister for the Natural Environment and Fisheries, Richard Benyon said: "Illegal fishing is not just theft from responsible fishermen and fishing communities it has a devastating impact on the fish in our seas and oceans. I'm delighted to see a project as innovative and revolutionary as FishPopTrace come to fruition. Protecting our seas and our honest fishermen from this abuse would be a remarkable achievement and I am confident that this technology will prove highly valuable in efforts to achieve sustainable fisheries globally."

Prof Gary Carvalho who headed the FishPopTrace EU consortium behind the new validation tools explains:

"A major existing problem is that it has not previously been possible to prove the exact origin of any particular fish, and in some circumstances, particularly with processed or cooked fish, it can be quite difficult even to identify the species, let alone its source of origin.

"We set out to develop a method that could be used throughout the food supply chain and across the fish industry, and have shown its effectiveness in four common European species, Atlantic Cod, Atlantic Herring, Common Sole and European Hake: each threatened by overfishing and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The tools can be used to identify or compare a set of pre-identified genetic markers within fish samples at any point in the consumer chain from net to plate, and to trace the fish back to their region of origin or breeding group. Such DNA-based tools can be used in tandem with existing technologies such as conventional labels, but importantly provides an independent and robust method for ad hoc tests of authenticity."

"This tool is also highly flexible. We have already identified the markers to separate populations of fish at large geographic scales, but the new methodology is powerful enough to identify fish from much smaller spatial scales, such as North Sea and Baltic cod. Moreover the system can be further developed for any fish species as required.

Far from being a punitive measure, the ethos behind the use of such tools is to assist the fishing industry, providing greater assurance of the population of origin and conservation status of the catch. The tool has application in validating various eco-certification and eco-labelling systems currently in use, but which are typically un-validated. Those charged with ensuring conservation and sustainability of our fish stocks will have a far greater ability not only to identify populations at risk or thriving but also a forensically validated system that can be used to test authenticity at any point in the supply chain to enforce the relevant legislation.

Last but not least, consumers will be able to purchase fish, confident in the knowledge that they are buying or eating the product described on the label or the menu and that their purchases are from sustainable fish stocks.

With the results validated, once rolled out, we can expect a greater number of cases to be brought before European courts, with the forensic evidence to support them, in much the same way that forensics is used as evidence in human crimes.

Carvalho concludes: "Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing has had a major role in the overexploitation of global fish populations. Improving this technology and spearheading its application in Europe, these new tools provide a new way forward for managing global fish resources, will revolutionise origin assignment and become highly valuable tools for fighting illegal fishing and mislabelling worldwide.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Bangor University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Einar E. Nielsen, Alessia Cariani, Eoin Mac Aoidh, Gregory E. Maes, Ilaria Milano, Rob Ogden, Martin Taylor, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Massimiliano Babbucci, Luca Bargelloni, Dorte Bekkevold, Eveline Diopere, Leonie Grenfell, Sarah Helyar, Morten T. Limborg, Jann T. Martinsohn, Ross McEwing, Frank Panitz, Tomaso Patarnello, Fausto Tinti, Jeroen K.J. Van Houdt, Filip A.M. Volckaert, Robin S. Waples, Jan E.J. Albin, Juan M. Vieites Baptista, Vladimir Barmintsev, José M. Bautista, Christian Bendixen, Jean-Pascal Bergé, Dietmar Blohm, Barbara Cardazzo, Amalia Diez, Montserrat Espiñeira, Audrey J. Geffen, Elena Gonzalez, Nerea González-Lavín, Ilaria Guarniero, Marc Jeráme, Marc Kochzius, Grigorius Krey, Olivier Mouchel, Enrico Negrisolo, Corrado Piccinetti, Antonio Puyet, Sergey Rastorguev, Jane P. Smith, Massimo Trentini, Véronique Verrez-Bagnis, Alexander Volkov, Antonella Zanzi, Gary R. Carvalho. Gene-associated markers provide tools for tackling illegal fishing and false eco-certification. Nature Communications, 2012; 3: 851 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms1845

Cite This Page:

Bangor University. "New means of safeguarding world fish stocks." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 May 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120522135036.htm>.
Bangor University. (2012, May 22). New means of safeguarding world fish stocks. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120522135036.htm
Bangor University. "New means of safeguarding world fish stocks." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120522135036.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

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